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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: October ::
Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1795  Saturday, 23 October 1999.

[1]     From:   David Kathman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 14:05:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1791 Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets

[2]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <
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        Date:   Friday, 22 Oct 1999 07:36:45 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1791 Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets

[3]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 22:44:42 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 14:05:00 -0500
Subject: 10.1791 Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1791 Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets

Geralyn Horton wrote:

>>I know this is the kind of query that scholars rightly abhor,
>
>The "unscholarly" cyber discussion group on Usenet,
>
>humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare
>
>has been reading, paraphrasing, and commenting on a sonnet a week for
>some time-we are now up to #118, I think.
>
>You can retrieve these discussions from archives, DejaNews: though
>someone else will have to give you the specifics of the process.
>
>I haven't done such a search myself.

I have an even better suggestion.  One of the regulars in the sonnet
discussions on humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare, Nigel Davies, has
been contributing very interesting and insightful close readings of each
of the sonnets, and he has archived these on his web page, at:

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Troy/4081/Sonnets.html

He has included many of the sonnets that haven't yet been discussed on
the newsgroup, so that most of them (except for some of the later ones)
are included.  He even includes his own "star rating" for each sonnet
along with his commentary.

Dave Kathman

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <
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Date:           Friday, 22 Oct 1999 07:36:45 +1000
Subject: 10.1791 Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1791 Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets

Clifford Stetner wrote:

>The web is getting pretty good for primary texts, but outside of a few
>journal articles, criticism is still woefully lacking.

I certainly agree.  This constitutes an even more woeful situation for
those of us like our correspondent in Tehran, and me out in the Pacific,
who do not have ready access to comprehensive academic library
facilities.  However, when I compare the amount of criticism on the web
now to the amount in 1995 when I first started using the internet, the
improvement and increase are spectacular.  Although, Heidi Webb Arnold
writes:

>I am glad for you that you don't have books of criticism where you
>live.

Apparently I should be glad.  I guess this means I can stop
impoverishing myself and enriching Amazon, BN, Frontlist, et al.

On a different note, I wrote:

>http://library.utoronto.ca/www/utel/ret/shakespeare/1609inti.html
>
>This is a marvelous site created largely by SHAKPER's own Hardy Cook.
>There's a good bibliography and useful appendices on themes, word
>frequency, etc.  The sonnets themselves are in old-spelling form,
>following the 1609 Quarto.
>
>[Editor's Note: Thanks for the compliment, but the edition is a result
>of a complete, five-year collaboration with Ian Lancashire. -Hardy]

Of course, and my apologies to Dr. Lancashire.  No disrespect was
intended; it was a careless oversight.

Karen Peterson-Kranz
Dept. of English & Applied Linguistics
University of Guam

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 22:44:42 +0100
Subject:        Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets

Heidi Webb Arnold writes

>I'm from a poor rural area so that's very
>different from Tehran or anyplace overseas,

On the contrary, many places "overseas" (from the US) have poor rural
areas.

On a more substantive point:

>in answer to your question about books
>available on the sonnets, I think those books are evil

Perhaps they should be burned?

>I am glad for you that you don't have books
>of criticism where you live.

Well, it sounds like Parviz Nourpanah would like to have the choice
whether or not to read these 'evil' books. I'm given to understand that
Iran has a strong tradition of English literature scholarship (Joyce
apparently is widely taught in schools) which sounds rather more
open-minded than the reply received to Parviz's request.

A delicious irony for readers of the poetry of Bobby Sands (poet and IRA
hunger striker who died trying to achieve recognition as a political
prisoner) is that a road in Tehran has been renamed in his honour. One
imagines that the gall rises in British government officials forced to
address their diplomatic mail to the British Embassy, Bobby Sands
Street, Tehran.

Gabriel Egan
 

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