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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: October ::
Re: Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1801  Saturday, 23 October 1999.

[1]     From:   A. D. Murphy <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 16:34:21 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1787 Re: Hamlet

[2]     From:   Scott Oldenburg <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 16:23:54 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1787 Re: Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           A. D. Murphy <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 16:34:21 +0100
Subject: 10.1787 Re: Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1787 Re: Hamlet

I missed the beginning of this thread, so I apologise if I'm repeating
something that has already been said by someone else. Edward P. Vining
(in)famously argued in The Mystery of Hamlet. An Attempt to Solve an Old
Problem (1881) that Hamlet actually is a woman. Ann Thompson has an
excellent essay on the deployment of the idea in a silent film version
of Hamlet featuring Asta Nielsen (1921), in Shakespeare the Movie.

Cheers,
Andrew

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Oldenburg <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 16:23:54 -0700
Subject: 10.1787 Re: Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1787 Re: Hamlet

I like Clifford Stetner's reading of Hamlet; however, Freud did indeed
take into account the child's fantasies of being adopted, etc. (family
romance) but never to my knowledge used the concept in his analysis of
Hamlet.  Likewise, the child's observation of parental coitus (the
primal scene) plays an important role in Freud's development of the
theory of neurosis, particularly in the case history of the "Wolf-Man."

SHAKSPER, however, is dedicated to the discussion of Shakespeare and his
works, so I should relate this back to the topic at hand in some way;
for an analysis of Hamlet in terms of the primal scene, see Otto Rank's
_The Incest Theme in Literature and Legend_, particularly the chapter on
Shakespeare's Father-Complex, as well as the articles on Hamlet in Ella
Sharpe Freeman's Collected Papers.

Respectfully yours,
Scott Oldenburg
 

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