1999

Commercial Announcement from Ashgate Publishing

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1708  Friday, 8 October 1999.

From:           David Kissner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 07 Oct 1999 13:41:47 -0400
Subject:        Commercial Announcement from Ashgate Publishing Company

"Americans on Shakespeare, 1776-1914" and "The Shakespearean
International Yearbook" are available at a 20% discount on Ashgate
Publishing Co.'s Web site through October 31, 1999.

How do I order?  It's easy!

Just go to Ashgate Online at <http://www.ashgate.com> and search on the
title, the author, or the ISBN.  To order, simply follow the "order this
book" link/button at the bottom of the online book description page.  To
receive the discount, please accompany your order with the message
"Shakespeare discount" in the comments section on the order page.

For more information, please see Ashgate Online's News & Special Offers
section.

AMERICANS on SHAKESPEARE, 1776-1994
Edited by Peter Rawlings

Shakespeare is "the great author of America" declared James Fenimore
Cooper in 1828.  The ambiguous resonance of this claim is fully borne
out in this collection of writings on Shakespeare by over forty
prominent Americans.  Featured writers include Ralph Waldo Emerson,
Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Abraham Lincoln,
Walt Whitman and Mark Twain.  The essays -- many of which are reprinted
here for the first time and  arranged in chronological order-provide a
fascinating conspectus of American attitudes to Shakespeare and chart
the emergence of an American literary tradition and the gradual
appropriation of Shakespeare as part of the American search for cultural
identity.

ISBN 1-84014-664-3     1999     576 pp.     Hardback
LIST PRICE:  $78.95 / 


Announcing Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography,

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1707  Friday, 8 October 1999.

From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 7 Oct 1999 13:06:58 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Announcing Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography, Fall 1999

                           ANNOUNCING THE
                        ROSENBACH LECTURES

                UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA LIBRARY

On October 25, 26, 27, and 28, Professor Randall McLeod of the
University of Toronto will deliver the A. S. W. Rosenbach Lectures in
Bibliography at the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library at the University of
Pennsylvania.

The title of the series is "Material Narratives: The Printing of Two
Sixteenth-Century Books." Professor McLeod has written of it: "We all
know about reading the text of a book. These lectures are about reading
the physical book itself.

"In their neglected physicality, printed books often record in
surprising detail stories of their being manufactured, assembled and
read.  It is this material language of the book, this body language,
that these lectures will attempt to read-and to lead to points of
contradiction with literary meaning. As the language is visual and
spatial, the lectures will be densely illustrated.

"The lectures can be understood individually, but they will make better
sense in pairs. The two printed books to be discussed are Castiglione's
'Book of the Courtier,' printed at the Aldine Press in Venice in 1528
(the first two lectures), and an Old Testament, printed by Robert
Estienne in Paris, 1539-44 (the last two lectures).

"Although the lectures will be technical, they are intended to be
introductory: the technical perspective and terminology will be
developed as we go. No specialized knowledge about bibliography is
expected-or about scripture and theology, or about litereature and
literary theory, or about these particular works, or, indeed the
languages in which they were written, Italian and Hebrew. In fact,
unfamiliarity with the works may speed access to the wonder of their
material narratives."

Trained in Shakespeare and the English Renaissance, Professor McLeod has
made his reputation in textual criticism and the editorial tradition. He
has written pioneering studies of Shakespeare, George Herbert, and John
Donne, among others, and his distinctive approach to texts has
overturned many received textual traditions.

Each lecture will begin at 5:30 PM in the Class of '55 Room, located on
the second floor of the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library on the Penn campus.
The Library is located at 34th and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia.  It
can be entered from Locust Walk, just behind a statue of a broken
button. The series is free and open to the public.

For additional information contact Michael Ryan at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
or at 215-898-7552.

Shakespeare in Italy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1705  Thursday, 7 October 1999.

From:           A. D. Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 7 Oct 1999 10:48:39 +0100
Subject:        Shakespeare in Italy

I wonder if I could trouble the list with a question about productions
of, or critical discussions of, Shakespeare during the fascist era in
Italy. I have a master's degree student who is fluent in Italian and is
casting about for a dissertation project that would enable him to make
use of his language. His current idea is to look at 'Shakespeare Under
Fascism' in Italy, but it's difficult to say whether this is a feasible
idea. Was Shakespeare produced in Italy during this period? Were Italian
writers and intellectuals much interested in Shakespeare?

Any help that list members could give-even if only pointing toward books
or sources that the student might look at-would be very gratefully
received.

Feel free to reply off-list, if you think it more appropriate.

Thanks in advance,

Andrew
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Old Bill

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1706  Friday, 8 October 1999.

From:           Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 7 Oct 1999 12:15:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1703 Re: Old Bill
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1703 Re: Old Bill

With winter nipping in the air, perhaps now would be the time to ask-is
it really true that, as I used to see blazoned about London, "Old Bill
cures winter blues"?

Laura Fargas

Tales from Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1704  Thursday, 7 October 1999.

From:           Michael Ullyot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 7 Oct 1999 01:09:18 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Tales from Shakespeare

I wonder if anyone can recommend narrative versions of Shakespeare's
plays preferable to the 19th-c Tales from Shakespeare by Charles & Mary
Lamb. We are arranging Pericles for performance and would like to
replace some scenes with narrated sequences. If anyone has met with
success or failure in a similar endeavour, I would be very interested to
hear of it.

Michael Ullyot
University of Toronto

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