1999

Re: Peer Cities

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1688  Wednesday, 6 October 1999.

From:           Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Oct 1999 10:33:36 -0500
Subject: 10.1687 Re: Peer Cities
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1687 Re: Peer Cities

I seem to be the originator of the post that "professional productions
are no longer mounted" at Odessa, Texas.  Also living twenty miles from
Odessa, Texas, in Midland, Texas, I should probably correct the
impression that I gave in a post some time ago.  The next Shakespeare
play at the Odessa Globe Theatre is directed by someone from the
National Shakespeare Company (I can't remember his name, and I lost the
article about it) but I am planning to go and looking forward to it.

My apologies to the actors--like Hippolyta in MSND, I didn't mean "no
disrespect!"

Judy Craig

Re: Peer Cities

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1687  Tuesday, 5 October 1999.

From:           Geoffrey Forward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 04 Oct 1999 16:50:32 -0700
Subject: 10.1572 Re: Peer Cities Comparable to Ashland
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1572 Re: Peer Cities Comparable to Ashland

>Once again, I just had to respond to this post.  I live twenty miles
>from Odessa, Texas,

As a professional actor, I played a summer season of Shakespeare at
Odessa, TX. I loved playing in the Globe. The Texas hospitality was
unsurpassed. I remember it with great nostalgia. I'm sorry to hear that
professional productions are no longer mounted there.

Geoff

Re: False as water?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1685  Tuesday, 5 October 1999.

From:           Geoffrey Forward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 04 Oct 1999 15:34:43 -0700
Subject: 10.1643 False as water?
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1643 False as water?

I'm currently directing Othello for The Actor's Shakespeare Workshop, so
I have an immediate interest in the meaning of the line, "She was false
as water" (Othello, 5.2.132).

This is the way I read it.

The Arden Shakespeare notes Genesis, 49.4, "Unstable as water, thou
shalt not excel; because thou wentest up to thy father's bed; then
defiledst thou it: he went up to my couch."

This refers to Reuben, who slept (had sex) with his father's concubine,
Bilbah (Genesis, 35.22).

Going back to Genesis, 49, in verse 3, Reuben is described as having
great promise.

Reuben's sexual violation makes him unstable as water.

Water cannot be counted on to maintain a form or pattern. It cannot be
trusted.

Shakespeare's line -- false as water. Things false cannot be trusted.

Sexual violations link up Desdemona and Reuben in Othello's mind.

Hence, Desdemona, like Reuben, is false as water.

That's my take.

Geoff

"I deny your major,"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1686  Tuesday, 5 October 1999.

From:           Geoffrey Forward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 04 Oct 1999 16:08:15 -0700
Subject: 10.1632 Re: Jonson Edition
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1632 Re: Jonson Edition

I'm curious to know if the new Cambridge Complete Works will include as
a note on Falstaff's line, "I deny your major,"  I Henry IV, 2.4.467, my
analysis of Falstaff's unstated syllogism? It was published in the
Shakespeare Quarterly, Fall, 1990, under the title, "What 'Maior' is
Falstaff Denying?.

The article glances at Hardin Craig's suggested syllogism. Also, before
the Quarterly would publish it, I was asked to comment on David
Bevington's suggested syllogism.

The article is reprinted on the www.shakespeare-usa.com website.

For those of you who won't have time to look up the article, I believe
the correct syllogism is:

Major: All men who run are cowards
Minor: Falstaff ran
Conclusion: Falstaff is a coward

Geoff

Re: Old Bill

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1684  Tuesday, 5 October 1999.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 04 Oct 1999 09:02:38 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 10.1661 Re: Old Bill

[2]     From:   Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 2 Oct 1999 17:06:07 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Old Bill

[3]     From:   Mary Bess <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Oct 1999 00:13:19 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1677 Re: Old Bill


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 04 Oct 1999 09:02:38 -0700
Subject: Re: Old Bill
Comment:        SHK 10.1661 Re: Old Bill

I find it interesting that references to Shakespeare in TV shows,
movies, and street names fascinates this list so much.  It is far more
interesting to me than the TV show, movies, and streets themselves.
Can't say that I get it, but that may be my loss.

If anyone really cares, Palo Alto, CA has many streets named for men
(not women) of letters.  Homer, Chaucer, Cowper, and others are
represented.  I haven't quite figured out what Forest and Waverley are
doing in that grid, but there they are.  Nary a Shakespearean reference
amongst them, though a mile or so away is Oxford Street.  Do you think?
Naw, right next to that is Cambridge Street.  Must mean something else.

If you really want to have fun, try the wonderful community of
Stratford, Ontario.  There street after street is named for a
Shakespearean character.  So are the schools.

Hoping for an Austin Avenue or Bronte Blvd.,
Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 2 Oct 1999 17:06:07 -0500
Subject:        Re: Old Bill

More about Old Bill}  Oct.2, 1999:  Since we are threading our way
through all the geographical places, I might  also mention that when my
wife and I were on a cruise visit to Alaska about four years ago we took
the optional helicopter tour to a glacier.  Lo and behold li was the
Shakespeare Glacier, one of the glaciers there named after literary
figures.  Louis Marder, The Shakespeare Data Bank, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Bess <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Oct 1999 00:13:19 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 10.1677 Re: Old Bill
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1677 Re: Old Bill

Quite beside the point, New Mexico has a town (ghost) named Shakespeare,
and Albuquerque has several streets named from titles or characters. My
students anonymously left me a purloined street sign:  "OTHELLO-Dead
End."  Mary Bess

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