1999

Re: alterity

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1768  Tuesday, 19 October 1999.

From:           Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Oct 1999 01:22:41 +0100
Subject: 10.1759 Re: alterity
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1759 Re: alterity

>Since, to Levinas, the Other is also the source of
>the imperative, and God is obviously Other, there may be useful
>connections with the commitment which faith implies, beyond social
>constructs and political contingencies.
>
>Cheers,
>Se


Bowdlerized Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1767  Tuesday, 19 October 1999.

From:           Jadwiga Krupski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Oct 1999 16:32:51 -0400
Subject:        Bowdlerized Shakespeare

Many of us who, at one time or another, have taught English on the
secondary level, have been obliged to use "expurgated" versions of the
plays. In my case (the English Protestant public sector in Quebec, in
the seventies), this was due not to any outdated, puritanical
squeamishness, but to reasons of economy: any book that did not
literally fall apart, had to be used, until it did. My students followed
the text in their old books, while listening to the excellent Caedmon
recordings of the plays. Never was I rewarded with such rapt attention,
as when the class, having spotted the LACUNA, heard a skilled actor's
rendition of a great speech, i.e. Lear's on "adultery" (IV,vi.110-128).
Such experiences invariably engendered lively and interesting
discussions, so a school board's stinginess and an old bowdlerizer's
"marality" were turned to good account.

Cheers, Jadwiga Krupski

Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1765  Tuesday, 19 October 1999.

[1]     From:   Vince Locke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Oct 1999 08:00:16 PDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Oct 1999 16:02:13 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington

[3]     From:   H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Oct 1999 21:02:19 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Vince Locke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Oct 1999 08:00:16 PDT
Subject: 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington

In response to Harry Teplitz's question regarding the use of an "alien"
Cordelia and Fool, I read an interview w/ director Michael Kahn in which
he said that he wanted Cordelia to seem like she came from a different
family than her sisters.  This is an intriguing idea, since it would
play up the parallel theme of Edmund/Edgar's relationship.  How this
relates to the Fool though, I have no idea.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Oct 1999 16:02:13 -0400
Subject: 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington

In response to Jimmy Jung, it was not at all uncommon for Victorian
productions to cast a woman as the Fool, probably in the interests of
pathos. Shakespeare in Performance (by Parsons & Mason, published by
Salamander Books in 1995) has a truly ineffable photograph of one Mrs.
Poole in the role in 1863.

Dana (Shilling)

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Oct 1999 21:02:19 EDT
Subject: 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1758 Re: Mute Cordelia in Washington

While registering the difficulties described, I found the bond between
Cordelia and the Fool, always implicit, here most poignantly explicit.
Better than average production. Fine Kent. Very good Lear.  HRG MD ENDIT

New Film Adaptation of "Henry IV"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1766  Tuesday, 19 October 1999.

From:           Phillip A. Bramson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Oct 1999 14:02:18 -0400
Subject:        New Film Adaptation of "Henry IV"

[Editor's Note: Please respond directly to the poster.  --Hardy]

I am the producer of an independent film based on Shakespeare's "Henry
IV." I am eager to find a receptive audience and, with luck,
distribution.  Any leads you would be able to furnish would be greatly
appreciated.  I can be reached at the above address or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
.

Thank you for your consideration.

Phil Bramson

Re: Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1764  Tuesday, 19 October 1999.

From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Oct 1999 10:56:57 -0400
Subject: 10.1754 Various on Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1754 Various on Hamlet

"The woman" in Hamlet is perceived negatively-i.e., when Laertes tries
but is unable to avoid crying for Ophelia, he says that now "the woman"
is out once he finishes crying.

Dana (Shilling)

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