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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: September ::
Re: Silenced Fiancees
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1548  Thursday, 2 September 1999.

[1]     From:   Judith Craig <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 31 Aug 1999 19:46:10 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1520 Re: Silenced Fiancees

[2]     From:   Kate Brookfield <
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        Date:   Thursday, 2 Sep 1999 00:58:05 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1540 Re: Silenced Fiancees


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Craig <
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Date:           Tuesday, 31 Aug 1999 19:46:10 -0500
Subject: 10.1520 Re: Silenced Fiancees
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1520 Re: Silenced Fiancees

I think it is significant that Ferdinand and Miranda are playing at
chess-marriage may be that kind of relationship in which the desire for
power which men acquire at marriage (or a sexual relationship) threatens
a woman's security-sexual and otherwise.  Miranda knows that he is not
false in the game of chess and that he is speaking the truth when he
denies it-but she also knows that "for a score of kingdoms you should
wrangle,/And I would call it fair play" (5.1.173-74).  It seems to me
that here she is acknowledging not only her dark side-that he would be
false in the real world of sexual games and politics-but also that she
would approve it and not fight either by leaving or by choosing the
discomfort of a quarrel over the security a false lover.

Shakespeare here seems to me to be exposing his knowledge of the dark
side of even innocent and pure women-they know falsity is possible in
the real world and would choose comfort over truth.  Her cupidity seems
to be very much revealed in this scene, and it seems another instance of
Shakespeare's knowledge of people.  Young, sweet, pure virgins can have
a dark side too.

Sorry for my silence so long on the list--I have had to move for the
fifth time in two years.

Best,
Judy Craig

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kate Brookfield <
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Date:           Thursday, 2 Sep 1999 00:58:05 -0400
Subject: 10.1540 Re: Silenced Fiancees
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1540 Re: Silenced Fiancees

... Miranda, after making her optimistic observation, knelt wonderingly
in front of Antonio, gently touched his face) and we were made to feel
that her very innocence for the first time induced remorse, and Antonio
then was able to join in the final reconciliation.

Thank you for that detail of a production. I presume this action came
after Prospero's "new to you" retort.

(A good example of the way in which silence on the page can be, indeed
must be fleshed out by action on the stage.)

Agreed. Actions speak louder than words!

Kate Brookfield
 

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