1999

Re: Twelfth Night


The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1498  Thursday 26 August 1999.

From:           Kate Brookfield <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Aug 1999 01:35:39 -0400
Subject: 10.1478 Re: Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1478 Re: Twelfth Night

From:           Abigail Quart

>I must say, declarations of what? Ironclad future coupledom? Seem to
>have a very silencing effect on Shakespeare's heroines. Any other silent
>new fiancees besides Viola and Isabella (in Measure)?

Marina in Pericles doesn't even get asked her opinion on her engagement
to Lysimachus.  Her last words in the play are about her joy in
discovering her long lost mother. "My heart\ Leaps to be gone into my
mother's bosom". After all the trials, travelling, and separations in
that play it has always struck me as odd that Pericles is quick to send
his long lost daughter away again to live in far away Tyrus.

Perdita is not exactly a silent new fiancée in Winter's Tale, but she
little to say about or to her fiancé after order is restored and the
royal family reunited.

Even Imogen, (deserted wife, not fiancée)  is silenced in the ending of
Cymbeline. We presume she remains clinging to Posthumus during all the
revelations in the last scene. Does he deserve her?  We have to forgive
him, but it is not easy.

Miranda's final scene with her fiancé shows the happy couple playing
chess together.  Her final exclamation of joy with "the brave new world"
and all the beautiful people she is meeting is one of the most positive
declarations of hope in the future by a new fiancée.

These last plays are classed as "Romances", but the main theme is not
romance as we know it today.   All these plays use young love and lost
mothers as a means to restore the idea of order in the universe. When
the king is restored as father of the nation, the wives and daughters
take their place beside the king, not below him. In other words, future
happiness for all depends on family unity, national unity, and equality
between men and women!  We must presume that when order is restored all
marriages will be bliss so the new fiancées have no worries and nothing
to talk about. :-))

Kate Brookfield
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Re: Silenced Fiancees

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1540  Tuesday, 31 August 1999.

From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 31 Aug 1999 09:11:45 GMT
Subject: 10.1520 Re: Silenced Fiancees
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1520 Re: Silenced Fiancees

Yes, we do respond to Miranda's open-hearted exclamation, but surely not
without some reservation - it's one of the distinguishing marks of the
ending of this romance, compared with the others, that forgiveness and
reconciliation seem less full-hearted, less unconditional than in, say,
Winter's Tale.

Nonetheless in the recent Tempest in Leeds, with Ian McKellen as
Prospero and Claudie Blakely as a very fine Miranda, the director, Jude
Kelly, made a brave attempt to reinforce the 'plus' side, as Miranda,
after making her optimistic observation, knelt wonderingly in front of
Antonio, gently touched his face) and we were made to feel that her very
innocence for the first time induced remorse, and Antonio then was able
to join in the final reconciliation.

(A good example of the way in which silence on the page can be, indeed
must be fleshed out by action on the stage.)

David Lindley
School of English
University of Leeds

Job Opportunity

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1538  Tuesday, 31 August 1999.

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 13:30:34 PDT
Subject:        Job Opportunity

Dear Listmembers:

Even though the Fall semester has already started, we need English
instructors and a Spanish instructor at Voorhees College in Denmark,
South Carolina. Interested persons should reply to my email account:
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>. I will forward your statement of interest to
the Chair of the Humanities Division.

Jack Heller

Thrice-three Muses Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1539  Tuesday, 31 August 1999.

From:           Lisa Broome <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 16:27:43 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Thrice-three Muses Question

Hello Listmembers,

In A Midsummer Night's Dream, 5.1, Lysander reads "The thrice-three
muses mourning for the death/Of learning, late deceased in beggary"
(52-53) as one of the proposed and rejected entertainments at Theseus
and Hippolyta's wedding. The footnote in my Norton anthology says that
the lines are "Possibly a topical reference: Robert Greene, Christopher
Marlowe, and Thomas Kyd, university wits who began writing for the stage
in the 1580s, all died in desperate circumstances in 1592-94. But
satiric laments on the poverty of scholars and poets were commonplace"
(852 n1).

Does anyone know of recent scholarship regarding these lines, possibly
providing encouragements for the topical reference mentioned in the
note, other topical reference suggestions, or a fuller discussion
of/argument for the more commonplace one? I am away from my library at
the moment and am unable to look for treatments of these lines on my
own. When I read 5.1.52-53, I tend to think of Spenser's Teares of the
Muses, but in agreement with the note, I realize that complaints of this
sort were indeed commonplace. I'm interested in finding out more about
the lines' interpretation/reference if possible. Thanks in advance for
your help,

Lisa Broome

More ShaXXXespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1537  Tuesday, 31 August 1999.

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 16:44:24 -0400
Subject:        More ShaXXXespeare

Private 5 Amanda's Diary, a hetero hardore video, is entitled "Shocking
Shakespeare:  Romeo and Juliet Get Juicy" and boasts "a Sextet of Lusty
(L)asses."  It may be ordered from http:www.privateusa.com

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