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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: Neologisms
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1392  Monday 9 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Richard Carn <
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        Date:   Friday, 6 Aug 1999 11:08:50 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 10.1382 Words Coined by Shakespeare

[2]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Friday, 06 Aug 1999 12:30:55 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1386 Neologisms

[3]     From:   Ray Lischner <
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        Date:   Saturday, 07 Aug 1999 15:19:28 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1382 Words Coined by Shakespeare

[4]     From:   Ken Steele <
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        Date:   Sunday, 08 Aug 1999 17:45:42 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1386 Neologisms


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Carn <
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Date:           Friday, 6 Aug 1999 11:08:50 -0400
Subject: Words Coined by Shakespeare
Comment:        SHK 10.1382 Words Coined by Shakespeare

I have recently purchased "Words Coined by Shakespeare" and am still
enjoying it.  The work contains about 200 words and gives some etymology
as well as a quote or two from Shakespeare's use of the word.  Much of
the work comes from, or at least frequently uses, the Oxford English
Dictionary.

I know of no place on the internet which has anything like words first
used by the Bard but such an undertaking appears worthwhile.

As for words coined by Shakespeare that have not come into common use,
it would seem a very difficult undertaking.  This task will be made much
easier when the OED comes online, currently anticipated to be March
2000.  If the online dictionary may be searched for obsolete words with
their historical illustrations then comparison will be simplified.  In
this vein, as more English literature is databased their will be
increasing certainty as to the evolutions of word usage and coinage.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Friday, 06 Aug 1999 12:30:55 -0400
Subject: 10.1386 Neologisms
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1386 Neologisms

John Cox says

>I don't know of a book about Shakespearean neologisms (though others
>may), but my favorite non-starter is 'incarnadine' (to make red),

How environmentally sensitive of Barnardine to decline to participate in
a project that might the multitudinous seas incarnadine.

Doggerelly yours,
Dave Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ray Lischner <
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Date:           Saturday, 07 Aug 1999 15:19:28 GMT
Subject: 10.1382 Words Coined by Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1382 Words Coined by Shakespeare

>Is there an online site dedicated to words introduced to the language by
>Shakespeare?  (I see that there is a popular book.)

http://www.m-w.com/mw/lighter/shak/ShakHome.htm

Near the bottom of the page are a few words taken from the book. The
list of words changes weekly.

Ray Lischner  (http://www.bardware.com)
co-author (with John Doyle) of Shakespeare for Dummies

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ken Steele <
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Date:           Sunday, 08 Aug 1999 17:45:42 -0400
Subject: 10.1386 Neologisms
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1386 Neologisms

One obvious resource to track Shakespeare's neologisms is the Oxford
English Dictionary.  It tracks thousands of first uses by Shakespeare,
and I seem to recall he is credited with the most of any author.
Naturally, the King James Bible and Shakespeare were both at the top of
the canon of texts used to build the OED, and so there is a certain
prejudice there.

If you don't want to spend the time hunting through the paper version,
you might appreciate the speed of the electronic version on CD-ROM.

Ken Steele

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