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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1414  Wednesday 11 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Aug 1999 07:50:07 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1413 Re: Sonnets

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Aug 1999
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1413 Re: Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 10 Aug 1999 07:50:07 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 10.1413 Re: Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1413 Re: Sonnets

Cliff wrote:

> >That is the kind of reference one made to
> Elizabeth, if one wanted to
> >finish her reign with the same number of ears as
> one started with.

The phrase 'shaved closer than a Presbyterian's ears' leaps to mind.  I
thought it was Bacon who coined that phrase but I can't find a cite,
presently.

Anyone want to chime in with its genesis?

Yours in the work,
Dana

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 10 Aug 1999
Subject: 10.1413 Re: Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1413 Re: Sonnets

> From:           Clifford Stetner <
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>The first reason is that the genre is conventionally used as a
> metaphysical discourse involving Neoplatonic principles
>concerning the
> nature of love and poetry absurdly thinly veiled beneath a
>courtly
> romantic narrative.

Not originally-Both Dante and Petrarch (to go back no further) predate
the Platonic revival in the West.  Certainly commentaries on Petrarch's
sonnets tend to accrete Platonic interpretations, and there are aspects
of this in Sidney, but ...

> We might then ask if Shakespeare is conforming to
> the genre in this respect or diverging from it.  He clearly
>diverges to
> a great extent by the use of a male persona.

Gaspara Stampa (as a woman) used a female persona-Shakespeare was
(highly) unusual in using a male addressee as the object of his poems-a
different thing.

Robin Hamilton
 

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