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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: Langley
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1436  Tuesday 17 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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        Date:   Monday, 16 Aug 1999 14:57:10 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1424 Re: Langley

[2]     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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        Date:   Monday, 16 Aug 1999 15:12:15 -0400
        Subj:   Langley once more


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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Date:           Monday, 16 Aug 1999 14:57:10 -0400
Subject: 10.1424 Re: Langley
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1424 Re: Langley

Dear Louis, Thanks very much for your reply.  I think it must be King's
Langley that Ure was thinking of-I came across another reference that
said Langley was a manor belonging to Richard and Isabel, about 30 miles
from London, but I couldn't locate it by that name.

Best wishes,
Helen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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Date:           Monday, 16 Aug 1999 15:12:15 -0400
Subject:        Langley once more

According to the King's Langley website (a very small one indeed!)
http://www.paceproductions.com/Kings_Langley_village.shtml Edward III
owned a castle here (built in the 12th c), and left it to Edmund
Langley, Duke of York.  York died in 1402, a couple of years after his
nephew Richard II, and was buried in the Langley church, which is still
extant.  The village is located 20 miles NW of London, not far from
Heathrow.  Since Queen Isabel was apparently left in the care of York
for the duration of the Irish campaign, it's not perhaps surprising for
anyone to assume that the garden scene happened at Langley.

Helen Ostovich
Editor, EARLY THEATRE / Dept of English CNH-321
McMaster University
 

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