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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: British Library
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1475  Tuesday 24 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Colin Aaron <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Aug 1999 11:02:06 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library

[2]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Aug 1999 16:36:32 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library

[3]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Aug 1999 18:24:29 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library

[4]     From:   Laura Fargas <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Aug 1999 23:20:45 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin Aaron <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Aug 1999 11:02:06 -0700
Subject: Re: British Library
Comment:        SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library

The new library sucks.  I took a tour of it in June.  A veritable
carbuncle as I believe Prince Charles described it.  Its one redeeming
feature is a glass enclosed central column of bookshelves holding the
collection of, I believe, King George III.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Aug 1999 16:36:32 -0400
Subject: 10.1467 Re: British Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library

For what it's worth, the London represented on the early modern stage
appears to be considerably more violent place than the London visible to
social historians; although there is much disagreement about the skimpy
data, I don't know of any modern authority who argues that ordinary
citizens feared for their lives and property every time they stepped out
into the street.

David Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Aug 1999 18:24:29 -0400
Subject: 10.1467 Re: British Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library

>         Subj:   Bloomsbury's "Mean Streets"

>What a shock to learn from a fellow SHAKSPERian that
>all that time I was
>sitting on benches in Bloomsbury Park, browsing the shops on the little
>streets south of the Museum, or pub-hopping around the University that I
>was in mortal danger

I must second Tom Dale Keever.  I, as a lone female, have stayed in the
very cheapest hostel/hotels in the area, wandered from museum to shows
to midnight fringe and back on foot or by underground, never felt the
least uneasy.

However, from American urban habit, I do not carry a purse. Papers &
books in cheap plastic shopping bag, money and passport around waist,
under jacket.

Geralyn Horton, Playwright
Newton, Mass. 02460
<http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Fargas <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Aug 1999 23:20:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1467 Re: British Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1467 Re: British Library

For whatever it's worth, here's my only scary London night-time
experience in many years of trips there:  I was walking home at one a.m.
one night and a man came out of a pitch-black alley within a couple feet
of me- inside that zone called "personal space," or whatever.  I
flinched and gasped.  He absolutely jumped like a jackrabbit.

I was the scare-er, not the scare-ee.  My American-female reflexes
frightened the poor man half to death.  So my voice is added to the
don't-be-put-off-Bloomsbury chorus.

T. Hawkes remarks:

>I have found that a Norton facsimile, judiciously wielded,
>will repel all but the most persistent creatures of the night.

Whereas a Routledge facsimile will provoke a fangy grin of recognition
and admission to their corrupt embrace?

Laura Fargas
 

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