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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: First Folios
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1507  Friday, 27 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 26 Aug 1999 15:23:15 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1501 Re: First Folios

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 26 Aug 1999 17:39:42 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1480 Re: First Folios


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Thursday, 26 Aug 1999 15:23:15 +0100
Subject: 10.1501 Re: First Folios
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1501 Re: First Folios

> Terry Hawkes comments that
>
> >You can't have a 'facsimile' of an idea.

Well before Hinman, and even before Shakespeare, Philip Sidney said
something to the effect that history provides a leaden world, poesie [I
suppose if he were writing now, he'd say "literature"] a golden
one-closer to the Platonic idea(l).

Norton may be a false simile for certain physical objects originating in
the early seventeenth century, but maybe when God reads Shakespeare,
that's the text he uses.

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 26 Aug 1999 17:39:42 -0400
Subject: 10.1480 Re: First Folios
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1480 Re: First Folios

Terence Hawkes writes:

>The Norton 'facsimile' has no such relationship to any Folio volume
>that has ever been seen to exist, anywhere, at any time, by anybody.

His objection to the word "facsimile" seems strained.  A facsimile is an
exact copy or likeness, an exact representation (I steal this from the
OED1).  A glance at the title page of the Norton facsimile should warn
us that this is not a facsimile of any ONE 1623 Folio, but a facsimile
of certain pages taken from various Folios now housed at the Folger.  No
one is being deluded.  There was and is no conspiracy.

Since Hawkes always has an idiological point, may I ask what it is,
please?

When Norton published the first edition of their Folio, it was sold (as
I recall) for about $12.00.  They sent me several free copies.  O, I
guess there was a conspiracy. Norton understood that anyone who reads
the facsimile becomes a knee-jerk capitalist!

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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