Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: Shakespearian Sunrises
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1524  Monday, 30 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Neil Spence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 27 Aug 1999 11:52:17 -0700
        Subj:   Also, The Sonnets Rise

[2]     From:   Jim Helsinger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Aug 1999 00:59:19 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1489 Also, the sun rises

[3]     From:   John Ramsay <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Aug 99 1:01:39 EDT
        Subj:   Re-SHK 10.1513 Re: Shakespearian Sunrises


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Neil Spence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 27 Aug 1999 11:52:17 -0700
Subject:        Also, The Sonnets Rise

The sunrise figures in several of the Sonnets. Below are a few of my
favorites:

VII
Lo! in the orient when the gracious light
Lifts up his burning head, each under eye
Doth homage to his new-appearing sight,
Serving with looks his sacred majesty;
And having climb'd the steep-up heavenly hill,
Resembling strong youth in his middle age,
Yet mortal looks adore his beauty still,
Attending on his golden pilgrimage:
But when from highmost pitch, with weary car,
Like feeble age, he reeleth from the day,
The eyes, 'fore duteous, now converted are
From his low tract, and look another way:
        So thou, thyself outgoing in thy noon:
        Unlook'd, on diest unless thou get a son.

XXXIII
Full many a glorious morning have I seen
Flatter the mountain tops with sovereign eye,
Kissing with golden face the meadows green,
Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy;
Anon permit the basest clouds to ride
With ugly rack on his celestial face,
And from the forlorn world his visage hide,
Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace:
Even so my sun one early morn did shine,
With all triumphant splendour on my brow;
But out! alack! he was but one hour mine,
The region cloud hath mask'd him from me now.
        Yet him for this my love no whit disdaineth;
        Suns of the world may stain when heaven's sun staineth.

CXXXII
Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying me,
Knowing thy heart torment me with disdain,
Have put on black and loving mourners be,
Looking with pretty ruth upon my pain.
And truly not the morning sun of heaven
Better becomes the grey cheeks of the east,
Nor that full star that ushers in the even,
Doth half that glory to the sober west,
As those two mourning eyes become thy face:
O! let it then as well beseem thy heart
To mourn for me since mourning doth thee grace,
And suit thy pity like in every part.
        Then will I swear beauty herself is black,
        And all they foul that thy complexion lack.

Cheers,
Neil Spence
San Francisco

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Helsinger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 28 Aug 1999 00:59:19 EDT
Subject: 10.1489 Also, the sun rises
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1489 Also, the sun rises

Check out Oberon's description of the morning to Puck in Midsummer.
Somewhere toward the end of act four, I think.  "But we are spirits of
another sort...."

In Henry IV,1 the morning sun before the battle is vibrantly described
as well, I think.

RIII describes a rainy morning before the battle.  "I wish these drops
were from the ground....."

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 28 Aug 99 1:01:39 EDT
Subject: Re: Shakespearian Sunrises
Comment:        Re-SHK 10.1513 Re: Shakespearian Sunrises

Hail SHAKSPERians,

There's also daybreak without sunrise at the end of R & J.

A glooming peace this morning with it brings;

The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:

Shakespeare was equally adept with descriptions of nightfall.

"Macbeth" in particular has several compelling examples.

John Ramsay
Welland, Ontario
Canada
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.