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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: First Folios
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1533  Tuesday, 31 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Tom Simone <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 1999 13:02:06 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1519 Re: First Folios

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 31 Aug 1999 06:06:02 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 10.1519 Re: First Folios

[3]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 1999 13:46:01 -0500
        Subj:   Mean Streets of London


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Simone <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 13:02:06 -0400
Subject: 10.1519 Re: First Folios
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1519 Re: First Folios

Just as a Folio "facsimile" reminder, the Sydney Lee First Folio volume
of 1902 is from a single copy, and its collographic process offers the
most detailed and attractive of all the Folio reproductions I have seen.

Granted this was limited to about 1,000 copies, it should be available
in most research libraries.

Best wishes for functioning brain cells and low blood pressure,

Tom Simone
Universtiy of Vermont

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 31 Aug 1999 06:06:02 -0400
Subject: Re: First Folios
Comment:        SHK 10.1519 Re: First Folios

Michael Cohen writes

 ' the more time you spend discussing the nature of your tools, the less
time you spend actually using them'

Dear Michael Cohen,

Your respect for tools is admirable.  Nonetheless, the fact remains that
the 'Norton facsimile' of the First Folio is still not a facsimile of
any existing First Folio. It follows that this 'tool' is a modern
construction, itself dependent on modern modes of mechanical
reproduction and, in its commitment to that modern abstraction, 'the'
First Folio text, undoubtedly at risk of imposing the prejudices those
modes embody onto a culture to which they are potentially alien. It is
the first duty of any scholar to examine the 'tools' with which he or
she is presented and expected to work.  These are rarely neutral
implements. Failure to take account of the extent to which any 'tool' is
likely to impose the presuppositions which shaped it on to the material
to which it is applied is a major dereliction of scholarly duty. Your
Golden Quill is hereby rescinded. Further outbursts may be reported to
Mr. Jensen.

T. Hawkes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 13:46:01 -0500
Subject:        Mean Streets of London

Terry Hawkes opines that a copy of the Hinman Facsimile of F1 might make
a good weapon against muggers in London in the British Library area.

The joke is even better than Terry knows.  Edwin Willoughby, the quondam
authority on F1,  was going home on foot to his flat in Chicago one
Friday night in the 1930s carrying a Newberry Library copy of the First
Folio in his briefcase to work on over the weekend.  Just outside his
apt. bldg he was approached by a mugger who demanded his wallet and his
briefcase.  He said nothing, but in guise of holding the briefcase out
to the mugger he swung it upward impulsively and hard and caught the
mugger  on the jaw and knocked him cold.  He left the mugger sprawled
and grabbed the briefcase even more tightly and ran up the stoop to the
front door of his apt. and dodged in and locked himself in and then
stood there trembling for an indeterminate but long time.  James
McManaway, who told me the story about 30 yrs ago, said that Willoughby
was very much a coward and a timid man.   Amazing what can be done with
a First Folio; no facsimile, this.

John Velz
 

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