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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: August ::
Re: Online Sources
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1534  Tuesday, 31 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 1999 09:42:26 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 10.1517 Re: Online Sources

[2]     From:   Joanne Gates <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 1999 14:00:52 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Cinthio's Moor on line (Othello source), etc.


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 09:42:26 -0700
Subject: Re: Online Sources
Comment:        SHK 10.1517 Re: Online Sources

Alas, I don't have access to Literature Online, if fact due to the
vagaries of my cute little life I won't have access to a good library
until January.  This is a plea for help.

I just read the completely charming first part of the story _The
Entertaining History of the King and Cobler (sic)_ which was printed in
Nottingham for the Walking Stationers according to the title page.  That
is all the title page has.  No date, no author, no nothin'.  I have a
facsimile of the first signature.  The title page indicated this is Part
the First.  The 16th page has End of the First Part.  Presumably there
are more parts.

It is the passably written story of Henry VIII in disguise doing a
prince and the pauper around nocturnal London.  Returning via the
Strand, he is impressed by the industry of a common cobbler.  Henry
breaks his shoe as an excuse to meet the man, then says bring the
repaired shoe to me at the tavern down the street.  They hoist a few
after the shoe is delivered, then return to the man's house and hoist a
few more.  At dawn, and fearing the wrath of the cobbler's wife, Henry
retreats to his castle inviting the cobbler to visit anytime.  Just ask
for Henry Tudor, he says, everyone at court knows me.

The cobbler does turn up, and to simplify a bit, is embarrassed, but the
kindly King joins him and they hoist a few together.  This prompts the
cobbler to sing an impromptu song about the kindness of the King.  And
so ends the first part.

I love this story, at least the bit of it that I have.  It isn't much
really, but scores so high on the charm meter that I want to know all
about it.

It is not mentioned in any of the books I have at home, nor in any of
the three books of English prose fiction I checked at the bookstore.
Can anyone on this list, or any of the non-list friends I am ccing,
help?  Is the author known?  What is the year or range of years of
publication?  Did it have many impressions?  Subsequent printings?  Most
importantly, is it in print either alone or collected?  If not in print,
in what book will I find it come January?

Any help will be appreciated.  Please forward to anyone you think may
know.  Answers off list are welcome, though it may be of general
interest.

BTW, I came upon the facsimile at the recently maligned British
Library.  It is part of their How Books Are Made display.  There is a
stack of sheets of this signature.  The public is invited to fold it so
the pagination is in sequence.  I'm embarrassed to say I blew it the
first time, and had to refold it about half way through.  If you are in
the BL, check it out.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Gates <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 14:00:52 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Cinthio's Moor on line (Othello source), etc.

The Verdi Opera net has the source for Cinthio's Moor of Venice.  It's
at:
http://www.classical.net:80/music/comp.lst/works/verdi/otello/otstory.html

I've been using it for several years, and it makes a good student
project to focus on how Shakespeare remade the tale, though Brian
Vickers does an excellent job of the same in his Appropriating
Shakespeare.

Plutarch's Life of Marc Antony is at
http://classics.mit.edu/Plutarch/antony.html. It's not the North
translation, but Dryden's.

The wager plot to Cymbeline is at the Decameron site at Brown:
http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Italian_Studies/decameron_english/02_09.html

Richard III Society has many texts in their e-library including More's
RIII at http://www.r3.org/bookcase/more/index.html

Joanne Gates
Jacksonville State
 

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