1999

Re: Twelfth Night

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1440  Tuesday 17 August 1999.

From:           Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Aug 1999 20:35:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1428 Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1428 Twelfth Night

I would say that Orsino's flaw is being in love with love and, perhaps,
of a kind of patriarchal attitude towards women that 12th Night works to
correct. He insists that Olivia love him simply because he wants her to,
and yet announces that women cannot love the way men do. After Viola's
"patience on a monument" speech, he begins to rethink his beliefs.  Of
course, he gets off easy (as commedic heros do), but there is a clear
shift in his thinking.

Annalisa Castaldo
Temple University

Q: Shakespeare Notes

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1439  Tuesday 17 August 1999.

From:           Mac Jackson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Aug 1999 12:23:02 +1200
Subject:        Shakespeare Notes

Conference Members

A new refereed quarterly, Shakespeare Notes, was announced in PMLA and
elsewhere in 1996.  I submitted (to Steven Doloff, Dept. of English,
Pratt Institute, 200 Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11205) a short piece,
which was accepted for publication. I've heard nothing since, and have
had no reply to a couple of  enquiries, a year or two apart, as to
whether the journal ever got off the ground.  Can anybody enlighten me?

Mac Jackson
English Department
University of Auckland

Laugh till you Shake? Shakespeare in Connecticut.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1437  Tuesday 17 August 1999.

From:           Ronald Benoit <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Aug 1999 16:16:39 -0400
Subject:        Laugh till you Shake? Shakespeare in Connecticut.

THE COMPLEAT WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE is coming to the Puppet
Theatre in Branford Connecticut September 24, 25 and October 1st and 2nd
at 8pm Tickets are only $12 ($10 if you order them in advance) Underdog
Productions

For more information, please contact <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or visit our
WebSite at: <http://hometown.aol.com/ctshakes/myhomepage/index.htm>

Play Synopsis:

Compleat (sic) Works has been travelling around Connecticut for almost
two years now.  The play centers around a small (3), but mighty (?) band
of Shakespearean (sort of) actors who present all 36 (sorry, 37) of the
Bard's plays in their loose (they like to ad-lib) but extremely original
(cause they can't remember the real lines) - adaptation (OK, they read
the Cliff's Notes).  Add lights, sets, and glorious Renaissance costumes
(old tights) for an uproarious send up of Shakespeare's works.

Also, I forgot to mention - this class is available for extra credit at
Yale University (fall '99)

-Underdog Productions

Q: Palladis Tamia

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1438  Tuesday 17 August 1999.

From:           Allan Blackman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Aug 1999 14:34:26 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Palladis Tamia

Can someone translate the title _Palladis Tamia_?  The work is
subtitled, "Wit's Treasury."  Is that to be taken as a translation of
the title? "Palladis" is apparently the genitive of "Pallas" or Athena,
who is associated with wisdom, so "Palladis" could mean "wit's."  But I
cannot find "Tamia" in any Latin-English dictionary.

Are there any Latin scholars out there?

Allan Blackman

Re: Langley

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1436  Tuesday 17 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Aug 1999 14:57:10 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1424 Re: Langley

[2]     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Aug 1999 15:12:15 -0400
        Subj:   Langley once more


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Aug 1999 14:57:10 -0400
Subject: 10.1424 Re: Langley
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1424 Re: Langley

Dear Louis, Thanks very much for your reply.  I think it must be King's
Langley that Ure was thinking of-I came across another reference that
said Langley was a manor belonging to Richard and Isabel, about 30 miles
from London, but I couldn't locate it by that name.

Best wishes,
Helen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Aug 1999 15:12:15 -0400
Subject:        Langley once more

According to the King's Langley website (a very small one indeed!)
http://www.paceproductions.com/Kings_Langley_village.shtml Edward III
owned a castle here (built in the 12th c), and left it to Edmund
Langley, Duke of York.  York died in 1402, a couple of years after his
nephew Richard II, and was buried in the Langley church, which is still
extant.  The village is located 20 miles NW of London, not far from
Heathrow.  Since Queen Isabel was apparently left in the care of York
for the duration of the Irish campaign, it's not perhaps surprising for
anyone to assume that the garden scene happened at Langley.

Helen Ostovich
Editor, EARLY THEATRE / Dept of English CNH-321
McMaster University

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