1999

Re: Elizabeth I

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1360  Monday 2 August 1999.

From:           Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 2 Aug 1999 05:42:59 EDT
Subject: 10.1312 Re: Elizabeth I
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1312 Re: Elizabeth I

I borrowed Maria Perry's book from the Columbus Ohio Public Library.
It's excellent.

Re: Sonnets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1359  Monday 2 August 1999.

From:           Clifford Stetner  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 1 Aug 1999 18:38:11 -0400
Subject: Re: Sonnets
Comment:        SHK 10.1336 Re: Sonnets

>Karen Peterson-Kranz wrote:
>
<snip>Arthur Marotti's "'Love is Not
>Love'... argues that not only Shakespeare, but that a great many of the
>>Elizabethan sonnet sequences, were in fact directed to Elizabeth.

While he does say:

"In Elizabethan England, a female monarch, whose unmarried state
preserved her symbolic and real value in both domestic and international
transactions, specifically encouraged the use of an amorous vocabulary
by her courtiers to express ambition and its vicissitudes."

and alludes to references to her in the work of Sidney, Spenser and
others, he refers only briefly to Shakespeare's work and in very general
terms without specifically locating Elizabeth in any of his sonnets.

Dana Shilling wrote:

>Funny kind of flattery
>
>Although Queen Elizabeth had a boundless appetite for flattery, she did
>not take kindly to being told to marry and procreate-certainly not by an
>obscure sonnet-wallah. And I can hardly imagine her being grateful for
>being described as a none-too-bright, two-timing slut, much less a
>none-too-bright, two-timing slut who is "pricked out for women's
>pleasure."

If he was an obscure whatchamacallit when he started writing the sonnets
(pace Karen Peterson-Kranz' reference to Katherine Duncan-Jones' dating)
he was not by the time he finished.  In any case, the sonnets (1-17) do
not so much tell anyone to procreate as beseechingly implore them to do
so.  If the increasing disenchantment with the young man's obtuseness
(if this is what you refer to) reflects an increasing disenchantment
with the queen, the poet may not have cared whether or not she took
kindly to it?

I admit that the prick of sonnet 20 is to my purpose nothing.  I can
only say that you have to dig through an awful lot of sonnets before you
find one prick.

Clifford

Shakespearean References

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1357  Monday 2 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 01 Aug 1999 09:48:03 -0400
        Subj:   Shakespeare in Lust

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 01 Aug 1999 22:33:12 -0400
        Subj:   Swingers, Man Without a Face, Sense and Sensibility


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 01 Aug 1999 09:48:03 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare in Lust

I ran across a porn video from Metro pictures called Shakespeare in
Lust_. Unfortunately, it is really only a compilation of hetero anal
scenes. There's no Shakespeare, just stuff like "ye olde blow job" on
the box cover.

Also, a stripper who performs Shakespeare named Rei (pronounced "Ray")
appeared on the Howard Stern TV show last Friday.  She was supposed to
read a "monologue" from Othello, but never got around to it.

Also of note: there's a pub called the Shakespeare Ale House in Terminal
Three of Heathrow airport, and there's a Shakespeare's International
Fish and Chips next to a pub called Othello's just outside of Victoria
Station (in London).

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 01 Aug 1999 22:33:12 -0400
Subject:        Swingers, Man Without a Face, Sense and Sensibility

In the film Swingers, a character who played Hamlet off Broadway has
come
to Hollywood to make it as an actor and met with bad luck.  He ends up
auditioning for Goofy at Disneyland and doesn't get the part.  There's a
reference to Shakespeare ("not a lot of call for Shakespeare out here" a
friend says to him as they golf) and the Hamlet character later says
"the past is all prologue to what's to come."

In Man Without a Face, Mel Gibson's character cites lines from Shylock
and adds some from Antonio as well (without crediting the latter).

The film version of Sense and Sensibility changes all of Austen's
literary references so that they are all to Shakespeare.

Pasties: One More Helping

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1358  Monday 2 August 1999.

From:           Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 1 Aug 1999 10:34:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Pasties: One More Helping

NPR's Weekend Edition reports this morning that bakers in Cornwall are
up in arms over a recent libelous swipe at their favorite meat pie in
The New York Times.  Actually two Times writers have bad-mouthed pasties
this month.
Here is what they have said:

"In Cornwall, Two Coasts In Four Days"

By SARAH  LYALL

July 18, 1999

. . . But I had never understood what all the fuss was about. To me,
Cornwall meant an interminable, martially discordant drive from London.
It meant weird, un-American cuisine like pasties, murky turnovers of
potatoes, meat and mystery ingredients (one of my sisters-in-law rudely
refers to them as "dog en croute").

- - -

"Perfecting the Art of the Tasty Escape"

By WILLIAM  GRIMES

July 25, 1999

. . .Not all the destinations have been a sure thing, as far as food
goes.  Cornwall, England, probably offers more bad food per square mile
than anywhere else in the civilized world. I have eaten the region's
renowned pasties by the dozen, and I am ready to pronounce a curse upon
them.  One of the novelty items you run across in Cornwall is a shiny
ceramic pasty, to be used as a paperweight or a doorstop, and I can't
see that it would be any worse than the real thing. It is surely
lighter. There's no point in going into detail on the local pasty known
as a "heavy."

                          - - -
                Tom Dale Keever
  Graduate Fellow - Columbia University
              This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
       http://www.columbia.edu/~tdk3

Re: "Perusine"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1356  Monday 2 August 1999.

From:           Allan Blackman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Jul 1999 19:14:14 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Reply to Query on "Perusine"

Perusine refers to Perusia (the modern Perugia), the most common usage
being the Perusine War.  See your Roman history for details.

Allan Blackman

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