1999

Movie Database: How To

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1521  Monday, 30 August 1999.

From:           Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Aug 1999 17:59:53 +0300 (IDT)
Subject:        Movie Database: How To

This is a great source for refreshing the memory and winning bets.  The
database includes stuff from the birth of movies, as well as
television.  You can visit the site with a surfer, but email, although
it takes a few hours to get a response, is virtually costless.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten

To receive full help on the movie mail-server send e-mail
# with the subject
#
#  HELP
#
# to <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
#
# To receive a copy of the movie database FAQ which describes the
# whole movie database project, alternate access methods and other
# common questions, use the subject "HELP FAQ"
#
# Regards,  Internet Movie Database Server Daemon
#

Re: Silenced Fiancees

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1520  Monday, 30 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 27 Aug 1999 09:50:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1515 Re: Twelfth Night

[2]     From:   Kate Brookfield <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Aug 1999 01:00:35 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1515 Silenced Fiancees

[3]     From:   John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 1999 08:03:26 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 10.1515 Re: Twelfth Night


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Aug 1999 09:50:13 -0500
Subject: 10.1515 Re: Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1515 Re: Twelfth Night

>Kate Brookfield writes:
>
>>Miranda's final scene with her fiance shows the happy couple playing
>>chess together.  Her final exclamation of joy with "the brave new world"
>>and all the beautiful people she is meeting is one of the most positive
>>declarations of hope in the future by a new fiancee.
>
>David Lindley replies:
>
>Not sure I'd accept this - her 'sweet lord' plays her false, and the
>collection of lords to whom she addresses her comments on the brave new
>world are scarcely a distinguished company - surely we respond to
>Prospero's undercutting of her enthusiasm?

See here the two postures of modern Shakespeare criticism-Prospero and
Miranda still talking to one another!  But are not these two imaginative
attitudes both available, even dialectically so?  Ferdinand denies he is
playing Miranda false-perhaps he is not. Miranda sees Gonzalo as well as
Antonio.  Blake knew just what was going on: "The Blossom" and "The Sick
Rose".
Tom Bishop, Ph. D.
Associate Professor of English
Director,  Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities
Case Western Reserve University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kate Brookfield <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 28 Aug 1999 01:00:35 -0400
Subject: 10.1515 Silenced Fiancees
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1515 Silenced Fiancees

> >Miranda's final scene with her fiance shows the happy couple playing
> >chess together.  Her final exclamation of joy with "the brave new world"
> >and all the beautiful people she is meeting is one of the most positive
> >declarations of hope in the future by a new fiancee.
>
> Not sure I'd accept this - her 'sweet lord' plays her false, and the
collection of lords to whom she addresses her comments on the brave new
> world are scarcely a distinguished company - surely we respond to
> Prospero's undercutting of her enthusiasm?

Of course!  We know her joy is unreal idealism and she will have her
loss of innocence.  Nevertheless, we must assume that her words are
sincere and she expresses a joy she feels about  human potential.  We've
seen enough of the frailty of human nature throughout the play.

Do we not respond at all to her exclamation of innocent joy at the
beauty of humanity through the eyes of a naive witness? Haven't we all
at some time long to recapture that feeling of excitement and joy we
felt before we became "wise and learned"?   Don't we enjoy the joy and
pleasure children find in things we know are not real or will not last?
Or do we feel sad, because in our wisdom we know they will meet with
disillusion?

Nevertheless,  Miranda, the new fiancee, is silenced.  These are her
last words.  We are not told how she reacts to Prospero's response.   In
performance, his words can be spoken quietly as an aside, so that
Miranda is left believing there is some goodness in human nature.

The only light in a dark ending, perhaps?

Kate Brookfield

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 08:03:26 -0400
Subject: Re: Twelfth Night
Comment:        SHK 10.1515 Re: Twelfth Night

David Lindley writes:

>Not sure I'd accept this - her 'sweet lord' plays her false... <<

Surely Miranda is jesting.  Two young lovers joshing each other?  A
fairly common practice, after all.

Re: Shakespeare and Dante

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1518  Monday, 30 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Stanley Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 27 Aug 1999 14:52:31 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1504 Re: Shakespeare and Dante

[2]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Aug 1999 12:41:06 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1504 Re: Shakespeare and Dante


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stanley Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Aug 1999 14:52:31 +0100
Subject: 10.1504 Re: Shakespeare and Dante
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1504 Re: Shakespeare and Dante

'Shakespeare's knowledge of Italian' is discussed by Naseeb Shaheen in
an article with that title, Shakespeare Survey 47 (1994), pp. 161-9. Its
final paragraph reads 'It seems clear, therefore, from plays which have
an Italian source that Shakespeare could read Italian, and that for a
surprising number of plays he read those sources in Italian.'

Stanley Wells

Professor Stanley Wells The Shakespeare Centre Henley Street
Stratford-upon-Avon Warks. CV37 6QW Te.: 01789 201828 (direct line) Fax:
01789 294911

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 28 Aug 1999 12:41:06 +1000
Subject: 10.1504 Re: Shakespeare and Dante
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1504 Re: Shakespeare and Dante

>As I recall, after exhaustive poring over of microfilmed text
>facsimiles, I think I concluded (the paper now resides in a box on
>another continent) that some of the characterization of Emilia bore more
>resemblence to Tasso than to Chaucer, but it was pretty tenuous.  The
>language problem is more substantial than I was then willing to admit.
>I'm curious if anyone else has worked on this (either Shakespeare's
>knowledge of Italian or lack thereof, or use of Tasso)?

Teseida was, of course, written by Boccaccio, not Tasso.  Brain
malfunctioning and carelessness of the first order-I apologize to all.

Yours in embarrassment,
Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

Re: First Folios

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1519  Monday, 30 August 1999.

From:           Michael E. Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Aug 1999 06:54:37 -0700
Subject: 10.1507 Re: First Folios
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1507 Re: First Folios

Bill Godshalk writes

>Since Hawkes always has an idiological point, may I ask what it is,
>please?

It may be an ideological point, but it is also reminiscent of a very
common behavior, one I've engaged in myself-it's called a WAP (work
avoidance procedure): the more time you spend discussing the nature of
your tools, the less time you spend actually using them.  Questioning
the legitimacy of the tool (or even better, its actual existence), is a
very effective WAP. Thus, Mr. Hawkes may be striking a blow for
knowledge workers everywhere.

Best,
Michael

Re: Online Sources

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1517  Monday, 30 August 1999.

[1]     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 27 Aug 1999 08:30:57 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1508 Online Sources

[2]     From:   Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 1999 15:01:10 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1508 Online Sources


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Aug 1999 08:30:57 -0500
Subject: 10.1508 Online Sources
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1508 Online Sources

Many of them will be in Literature Online (LION), the Chadwyck-Healey
database (at chadwyck.com), to which you must have a subscription, which
many schools do. Check with your college library online folks. One of
their databases is of 200 works of Elizabethan prose fiction, two others
of "all of" English poetry and drama.

Frank Whigham

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 1999 15:01:10 +0100
Subject: 10.1508 Online Sources
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1508 Online Sources

David Nicol asks,

"I have a question. I'm looking for online e-texts of Shakespeare's
sources, such as Painter, Cinthio, etc. Does anybody know if such things
exist?"

"I haven't found any specific sites devoted to the subject, but perhaps
list members may have discovered a few of the sources tucked away in
corners of the Web."

I have tried our own  SHINE (Shakespeare in Europe) - "Links"-page at
http://www.unibas.ch/shine/SHINE_Links.htm for "16th and 17th Century
English Texts". There are several splendid sites which provide links to
online e-texts of sources and contemporaries, such as:
http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/index.html
http://web.uvic.ca/shakespeare/Annex/ShakSites11.html
http://www.unicatt.it/library/milano/BancheDati/Surfing.htm
http://www.humanities.ualberta.ca/emls/emlsetxt.html
http://www.ipl.org/reading/books/
http://www.library.upenn.edu/etext/furness/

But there is no Painter or Cinthio anywhere. Some hope, though: both are
listed (but not yet available) at

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/sources.html.

Markus Marti

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