1999

Re: First Folios

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1480  Tuesday 24 August 1999.

From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Aug 1999 06:53:52 -0400
Subject: Re: First Folios
Comment:        SHK 10.1464 Re: First Folios

Dear Gabriel Egan,

1. You can't have a 'facsimile' of an idea. The notion of facsimile
presupposes a specific and exact relationship to the concrete, physical
qualities of a pre-existing material entity.

2. The Norton 'facsimile' has no such relationship to any Folio volume
that has ever been seen to exist, anywhere, at any time, by anybody.

3. That apart, it remains an impressive monument to a sprightly
transatlantic energy. As American as Old Glory, egg cream, and the Jelly
Roll Blues, Hinman's Folio ranks with Wanamaker's Globe as the sort of
enterprise that will tell future generations as much about the
ideological contours of our own century as about the past. Floreat!

T. Hawkes

PS: You'll have noted Stanley Wells's chilling revelation concerning
Hinman's standing as 'Kadi' . The term means 'judge' in the Muslim
world. I will plead benefit of clergy.

Re: Hoghton Tower Controversy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1479  Tuesday 24 August 1999.

From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Aug 1999 00:18:01 -0400
Subject: 10.1463 Re: Hoghton Tower Controversy
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1463 Re: Hoghton Tower Controversy

The Arundels were adherents of Mary, Queen of Scots. Their heraldic
shield was all martlets, that "temple-haunting" bird (actually the house
martin) that populate Macbeth's castle. Mentioning martlets, thereby
tipping his hat to the Mary-loyal Arundels and Mary's King of England
son, James, also warned the audience that treason awaited Duncan in the
salubrious air of Macbeth's home.

Re: The Scottish Tragedy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1477  Tuesday 24 August 1999.

From:           Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Aug 1999 20:55:18 EDT
Subject: 10.1462 Re: The Scottish Tragedy
Comment:        Subj: SHK 10.1462 Re: The Scottish Tragedy

Many, many thanks to all who were kind enough to respond to this
inquiry!  As usual, the SHAKSPERians came through like gangbusters; I'm
sure the recipient will be thrilled, and I learned a thing or two myself
from your thoughtful responses!

Best regards to all,
Carol Barton

Re: Twelfth Night

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1478  Tuesday 24 August 1999.

From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Aug 1999 00:02:38 -0400
Subject: 10.1470 Re: Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1470 Re: Twelfth Night

I don't well understand the term "flaw" as applied to Orsino. In this
play, identity hinges on a loved one's recognition. Malvolio and  Andrew
are never recognized by Olivia, and so are seen as comical, sad,
pathetic. Antonio's identity vanishes with Viola, is restored with
Sebastian, and may possibly be lost again when Sebastian chooses the
Olivia he doesn't know over the Antonio he does.

Is unrequited love a "flaw?" Must we only love in sure certainty of
return?  Then, Viola is thus flawed. And Olivia. (It wouldn't be the
first time Shakespeare has created three characters with a single flaw:
Isabella, Angelo, and the Duke are all characters who believe themselves
above mortal passions in Measure.)

But Orsino is saved from this loss of identity caused by a rejection of
Olivia's love because Viola is in love with him at the moment we meet
him.  She saves him from being ridiculous. For how long  has she been
all his comfort? Heard all his confidences and never laughed at him?
Maybe this is what he realized at that last revelation.

I must say, declarations of what? Ironclad future coupledom? Seem to
have a very silencing effect on Shakespeare's heroines. Any other silent
new fiancees besides Viola and Isabella (in Measure)?

Re: Arden Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1476  Tuesday 24 August 1999.

From:           Ray Lischner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Aug 1999 18:09:28 GMT
Subject: 10.1465 Re: Arden Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1465 Re: Arden Shakespeare

David Levine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

>Of course no one asked me, but that one-volume Arden Shakespeare is one
>of the most dreadful rip-offs I have ever seen.  It has virtually NO
>apparatus, even while it trades on the "Arden" name which, if anything,
>suggests that the edition is going to boast all sorts of authoritative
>scholarship to ACCOMPANY the text.  Of course, anyone who looks at the
>book can see that it's hardly worth having, especially at the price.

I think the Complete Arden Shakespeare is an excellent deal for the
average reader. It is, of course, unsuitable for scholarship, but that
is not its purpose. Personally, I think any home library is incomplete
without the works of Shakespeare, but I do not expect the average reader
to purchase a complete set of individual Arden editions. When friends
ask me to recommend an edition of Shakespeare's complete works, I
suggest the Arden. At $32 (from amazon.com), it is a bargain. The
Riverside, for example, costs twice as much.

Ray Lischner  (http://www.bardware.com)
co-author (with John Doyle) of Shakespeare for Dummies

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