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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: July ::
Re: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1203  Thursday, 1 July 1999.

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:35:55 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

[2]     From:   Nick Kind <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:54:17 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

[3]     From:   Richard Burt <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 10:16:10 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

[4]     From:   Douglas M Lanier <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 10:52:38 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Editing Shakespeare tapes

[5]     From:   Billy Houck <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:29:19 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

[6]     From:   E. Dietz <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:55:34 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

[7]     From:   Marcia Tanner <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 16:30:20 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

[8]     From:   Scott Crozier <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 Jul 1999 08:13:35 +1000
        Subj:   Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

[9]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 21:00:44 -0400
        Subj:   Fine Distinction


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:35:55 +0100
Subject: 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

David Evett asks

> I'm developing a Shakespeare film course, and would
> like to prepare tapes with selected bits of the
> full-length films in the selected order for classroom
> use. Our media service won't do the editing for fear of
> copyright lawsuits unless I can get written permission
> from the right holders.  Do any of you experienced in
> this realm have advice?

My employer, De Montfort University, has told me to follow these rules:

1. Any film which has been shown on terrestrial television in this
country (UK) can be shown to students in its entirety.

2. Other films can be excerpted using approximately the same rule as
xeroxing of printed works: up to 5% of the work.

I believe that US and UK copyright laws are now essentially the same in
this regard.

I found it a simple but laborious process to make my own extract tapes
using two VCRs. So long as you're copying first-generation material and
you switch off the 'long-play' feature, the quality is adequate.

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Kind <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:54:17 +0100
Subject: 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

Dave:

This is a seriously sticky area, and your media services are right to be
concerned. Admittedly my experience only comes from clearing rights for
Ardenonline, a for-profit online service, but here it is for what it is
worth. Indeed, in Ardenonline we decided not to include video material
as the rights issues were too difficult (bandwidth was also an issue,
but not the main one).

As your use will be for educational purposes, some will claim that you
have a right to use selected excerpts under "fair use" provisions in
copyright law (this is different in the US and in Europe, and I am no
expert). Others will take the line at the other end of the spectrum, and
tell you to clear rights whatever the use. And, to follow the letter of
the law, those rights do not only need to be cleared with the film
distributor, but also with actors, musicians, designers, etc...

My conservative advice: talk to a lawyer at your institution. You, or
the institution, don't want to be the guinea pig for this kind of law.

Nick

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 10:16:10 -0400
Subject: 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

Your media service is misinformed about the law.  They can copy parts
for educational use, just as you can xerox parts of a book for the same
purpose.  I suggest you contact your university lawyer and have her or
him talk to your media service about the law.  If you can afford a
second VCR, you can simply dub the parts of a given video yourself.
That's what I did until we got a DVD player (which allows you to jump to
a scene so that you can't go back and forth through a film without
wasting all that time rewinding and fastforwarding).

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 10:52:38 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Editing Shakespeare tapes

Academic libraries have become quite skittish about editing or copying
tapes, even for classroom use only.  (Our library will not allow us even
to put off-air recordings on reserve.)  But my understanding is that
classroom-use recordings are perfectly legal under current copyright
laws (just as are classroom-use xeroxes).

Tape-to-tape dubbing is made difficult by a copy-protection scheme
called Macrovision included on most recent VCRs.  It will lead to a
muddy or distorted copy (at best). If you will be doing a lot of
tape-to-tape dubbing, consider investing in a GO video double cassette
machine, which makes tape dubbing quite convenient.  I do not know
whether GO video supports the copy-protection mechanisms present in most
VCRs.  GO video has a website at www.govideo.com.  (I have no connection
with this company.)

The most convenient way to make compilation tapes is to dub them from
laserdiscs.  Laserdiscs have no copy protection, and they often respect
the widescreen ratios of the original films. The video quality is much
higher than what you can get from tape-to-tape dubs, and you can control
moment of start and stop quite handily.  This assumes that you can get
access to laserdisc recordings of Shakespeare performances, many of
which are out-of-print and now quite expensive.

DVD is also convenient, but it features powerful copy-protection
software designed to prevent dubbing.  (Anyway, there are relatively few
Shakespeare DVDs on the market right now.)

There are some devices on the market that defeat the copy protection
features on tapes and DVDs.  SIMA Copymaster is one of these-see
www.videoguys.com/sima.htm.  I have no connection with this company, and
I have no direct knowledge about whether or not this device works.  But
many in video discussion groups say it is quite effective for creating
decent dubs.

I hope that some of this information is helpful.

Cheers,
Douglas Lanier
University of New Hampshire

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Billy Houck <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:29:19 EDT
Subject: 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

This doesn't solve the legal problems, but if you can, procure a GO
VIDEO 2-deck VCR. They're designed for exactly that purpose.

Billy Houck

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           E. Dietz <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 11:55:34 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

To:  David Evett

A few years ago, I worked with a professor here at the UI to transfer
different versions of videotaped Shakespeare productions to CD-Rom for
classroom use.  Since these versions were for classroom use only,
copyright laws allowed us no more than a total of 3 minutes (if I
remember right) of each film, so the clips are fairly short, and tend to
emphasize transitional moments, costuming, etc., rather than entire
speeches.

The Mac programs we used were Avid Cinema (to 'bring in' and edit
videotape onto the hard drive) and Director (to write a 'script' for the
CD allowing it to play clips in a certain order, etc).  We also acquired
an extra hard drive and a CD toaster.

All this required a grant-to acquire both equipment and additional
videos-plus some initial training with the UI's multimedia production
staff.  It's well worth it, though:  I'm teaching our entry-level
"Shakespeare" course to English majors, and the CDs make a fantastic
resource to talk about interpretation, production history, etc.

Elizabeth Dietz
University of Iowa

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[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcia Tanner <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 16:30:20 -0400
Subject: 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1091 Query: Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

I may be wrong, but I was under the impression that showing video clips
within a classroom setting was perfectly acceptable by copyright law.  I
learned how to use our Video Toaster last year for just this purpose-
showed the same scene from several Hamlet productions to elicit class
discussion, comparison/contrast etc.  I gave students a handout
explaining where each clip came from and let them know which ones were
available in our school media center and which ones they would have to
go out of the building to find.  I thought that covered any copyright
laws.

Marcia Tanner

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[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 Jul 1999 08:13:35 +1000
Subject:        Editing TV Tapes for the Classroom

David Evett asked about copyright problems and films in use in academic
institutions.  Although I don't dare assume that I understand it, the
American Copyright Association (or whatever their correct name is) has
just handed down a 200 page report on this and the matter of copyright,
the internet and the meaning of life.  I know that they deal with
David's problem; one that we all face.  If we wait a little while the
laws will become more manageable for all of you in America and
eventually the effect will ripple across the Pacific, and I suspect the
Atlantic.

        Wait patiently, David.
        Regards,
        Scott Crozier

[9]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 21:00:44 -0400
Subject:        Fine Distinction

The Copyright Act ( 17 USC Section 110) contains a provision allowing
performance, display, and broadcasting of NONDRAMATIC works in the
classroom, so it won't help with broadcast of dramatic films.
Technically speaking, your AV department is correct-creating a
derivative work (compilation tape) is in fact infringing unless you have
permission to use the works in this way.

You could luck out if any of the films you want to use are televised,
because a Copyright Office guideline allows non-profit educational
institutions to tape copyrighted films off-the-air and use them in
class-as long as the tapes are erased within 45 days.  However, it
sounds like you have actual copies of the films. Another copyright
concept, the "first sale doctrine" says that the owner of a book,
videocassette, or other copyrighted work that is NOT a computer program,
can re-sell, give away, or display that copy of the work. If your VCR
can display index numbers, just put a stick-on note identifying tape #1,
2, etc. Cue up each tape to the point you want to start, let it run to
the point you want, then fast-forward to the index number of the next
footage you want to show. (You'd have to stop and start a compilation
tape anyway.) I must admit that it sounds like a distinction without a
difference, but that's why so many people agree with Dick the Butcher...

Dana (Shilling)
 

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