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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: July ::
Re: Hamlets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1319  Monday, 26 July 1999.

[1]     From:   Andy White <
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        Date:   Saturday, 24 Jul 1999 01:23:46 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1307 Re: Hamlets

[2]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Saturday, 24 Jul 1999 10:54:41 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1307 Re: Hamlets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andy White <
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Date:           Saturday, 24 Jul 1999 01:23:46 -0400
Subject: 10.1307 Re: Hamlets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1307 Re: Hamlets

Sean Lawrence writes:

>Actually, I didn't see it as squalid at all.  Everyone can afford to
>ride horses, an aristocratic pursuit, and eat meat.  The whole thing
>made me think of a relaxing barbecue.

For pure squalor, nothing can hold a candle to Kosintsev's Hamlet, which
is available through some educational company in NJ.  The opening shots
give you menials shouldering the wheel, and there are lots of bleak
landscapes, the atmosphere is almost Bergmanesque.

Or, perhaps I've got that bass-ackwards:  Bergman takes his cue from
Hamlet? Who knows.

Andy White

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Saturday, 24 Jul 1999 10:54:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1307 Re: Hamlets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1307 Re: Hamlets


Sean wrote:

> >In fact, seeing the squalor of Denmark in this
> production also gave me a
> >new perspective....
>
> I just think that it looks vaguely medieval.  Nobody
> seems to be cold or
> going hungry for lack of purchasing power.

I think that the players in the Mel Gibson version where esp squalid.
In fact, the director cut out the test to which Hamlet puts the players
to allow us to see them more alone the lines of 'gypsies' than
accomplished thespians.  This in my opinion makes even more ironic the
speech where Polonius declares the players to be the greatest in the
world.

Yours in the work,
Dana
 

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