Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: July ::
Re: Shakespeare's Current Popularity
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1329  Tuesday, 27 July 1999.

[1]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Jul 1999 18:26:45 +1000
        Subj:   Re: Reasons for Shakespeare's Current Popularity on Film

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tue, 27 Jul 1999 12:34:19 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare's Current Popularity


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Jul 1999 18:26:45 +1000
Subject: 10.1318 Reasons for Shakespeare's Current Popularity
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1318 Reasons for Shakespeare's Current Popularity
on Film

>What do you think accounts for the number of films relating to
>Shakespeare and for his burgeoning popularity (if in fact it is
>burgeoning) in the last decade or so?
>
>Thanks for your help!
>
>Susan Oldrieve
>Baldwin-Wallace College

Susan, I suspect you'll be sorry you asked.  You're going to be deluged
by responses.

In my opinion, it goes straight back to Branagh's first two filmed
versions, Henry V and Much Ado.  Whatever one may think of Branagh's
interpretations of the texts, or of the specifics of his adaptations, he
showed that it was possible to speak Shakespeare's language, including
the verse, in a way which was easy for people with no background in
early modern language to understand.  That this often included radical
cutting-more than is acceptable by many-is still a point of debate.  It
doesn't, however, alter that Branagh found a way to defuse the
quite-common fear of feeling stupid that many people associate with
seeing Shakespeare.  The films that have followed, by Branagh and by
others, clearly show the influence of those first two adaptations.

My two cents, at any rate.

Cheers,
Karen Peterson-Kranz

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tue, 27 Jul 1999 12:34:19 +0100
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare's Current Popularity

Susan Oldrieve writes

>I 've been asked to do a short radio presentation for a local
> station on why Shakespeare has become so popular recently.
> I have some ideas of my own, but I am by no means an expert
> in this area, so I would appreciate the responses of listservice
> members to this question.

Gary Taylor had a piece in the British newspaper called The Guardian of
24 April 1999 arguing that Shakespeare is, despite the upward blips in
the last 5 years, on the wane. You will find the piece archived on the
newspaper's web archive. Go to

http://www.guardian.co.uk

then choose 'archive' from the drop-down list headed 'Useful stuff' and
enter 'Gary Taylor' as a the keyword search. I have an etext of it which
I'd be happy to send you if, as is often the case, the archive is down.

Gabriel Egan
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.