1999

Shakespearean References

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1253  Tuesday, 13 July 1999.

[1]     From:   Suzanne Westfall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 08 Jul 1999 16:47:06 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1249 Shakespeare Reference in Current Film

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Jul 1999 16:50:39 -0400
        Subj:   American Pie reference to Henry the Fourth, Part One

[3]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Jul 1999 16:51:41 -0400
        Subj:   "Starred-crossed lovers" opera arias CD


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Suzanne Westfall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 08 Jul 1999 16:47:06 -0400
Subject: 10.1249 Shakespeare Reference in Current Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1249 Shakespeare Reference in Current Film

Some Shakespeare also in ~Tea with Mussolini~, including Dame Joan
Plowright playing the balcony scene from R&J with cut-out puppets, and
quoting the St. Crispin's Day speech from HV at a young boy departing
for school in Austria.  Lord Laurence might be chuckling.  A later
quotation proves climactic, but I won't ruin any more of the plot!  Dame
Judi Dench emoting at the tomb of Barrett Browning is alone worth the
price of admission.

Suzanne Westfall
Lafayette College
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Jul 1999 16:50:39 -0400
Subject:        American Pie reference to Henry the Fourth, Part One

In the film American Pie, an update of he 1980s Porky's series, there is
a brief reference to Hal and Falstaff in an English class.  The teacher
tells the students that they are making a transition not unlike Hal's:
just as he had to leave Falstaff, they'll have to leave high school. Two
of the main characters (students in the class) ignore him and, as we
hear their conversation, the teacher's words fade into the background.
In a subsequent shot of the classroom, there's a large poster with the
words "Shakespearean England" written across the top.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Jul 1999 16:51:41 -0400
Subject:        "Starred-crossed lovers" opera arias CD

I recently came across a mention of a CD of opera arias entitled
"Star-crossed Lovers."

Bookstores in London & Paris

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1252  Tuesday, 13 July 1999.

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 08 Jul 1999 11:44:00 +0000
Subject:        Bookstores in London & Paris

Dear all,

I'll be flying to Paris by way of London next month to visit inlaws.
Since I'll be passing through these towns, I wonder if anyone can
recommend any really good (preferably second-hand) bookstores.
Obviously, I'm interested in Shakespeare and Renaissance writers, but
also in theory and in contemporary French philosophy.

Any suggestions will be gratefully entertained.

Cheers,
Se


Re: Unwitnessed Events

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1250  Tuesday, 13 July 1999.

[1]     From:   C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 8 Jul 1999 13:34:17 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.1244 Re: Unwitnessed Events

[2]     From:   Michael Ullyot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 05 Jul 1999 21:59:55 +0100
        Subj:   Unwitnessed events


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 8 Jul 1999 13:34:17 -0400
Subject: 10.1244 Re: Unwitnessed Events
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.1244 Re: Unwitnessed Events

 Richard Regan, in discussing Unwitnessed Events, states that:

> The crowd scene in Caesar is filtered through
> Casca's narration, stressing the conspirators' manipulation of Brutus:
> we cannot see Caesar's actions.

As Casca is not a conspirator (he hasn't yet been recruited to the
freedom fighters) when he reports what happened, and Cassius cannot know
what has happened until Casca reports it, I don't see how this scene
stresses the "conspirators' manipulation of Brutus."  It does, perhaps,
allow Cassius to further gauge Brutus's disposition by observing his
responses to Casca's report.

cdf

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Ullyot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 05 Jul 1999 21:59:55 +0100
Subject:        Unwitnessed events

My thanks to those who provided the latest profuse strains in response
to my questions and speculations about unwitnessed events in various
plays.

Susan Oldrieve: From what I can recall of the productions I've seen of
The Winter's Tale, 5.2 is presented rather straightforwardly as a few
characters discussing what has transpired in the reunion of Leontes and
Perdita (et al), and readying us for the scenes to come. The 1998 RSC
production followed that pattern, though if memory serves they may have
cut a few of the lines. The scene is obviously a vital piece of
stage-business, if the reunion is not to be presented. The question for
us (or for me) is why the playwright chose not to do so. Do Greene's
Pandosto or the other sources offer any insight?

Bruce Young contrasts this with the final scene of Cymbeline and reminds
us that dramatic economy prevents the staging of lengthy reunions and
explanations at the end of a comedy (or romance, in this case), since
this would be redundant for audiences who've sat there with ironic
knowledge of the truth throughout the play. Leontes' invitation for
further discussions offstage at the end of the play is a convention we
see in All's Well and Cymbeline, to name perhaps the best examples. This
is the interesting part: is it only in comedy (and romance) that we find
this need to unravel the tangled web of identities and deception,
usually offstage? Histories end with resolutions for new unity under a
better regime, and tragedies with a desire to forget the past and move
forward, but in comedies we find the desire to review and fully examine
the events of the play so that everyone's historical understanding will
be complete. Can we, in this tendency, distinguish (and this is a far
more general question) between romance and comedy?

That Bruce mentioned Cymbeline is too tempting an offer to resist: this
seems to me a wonderfully unusual play, unique in Shakespeare by virtue
of its historical subject and romance genre. Among the quasi-histories
it is generically unique (Macbeth and Lear being tragedies). So, what is
Shakespeare doing writing this play in 1609, 10 years after his last
history play (before the aberrant Henry 8 in 1613)? The theory that the
romances represent a "working-out" or revisiting of situations and
questions from his earlier plays might be brought to bear: is Cymbeline
a response of some sort to issues from the two tetralogies and King
John? It certainly reflects their tendency to begin and end stories from
history where the playwright finds them most suitable to his purposes,
and revises their various descriptions of offstage events. I ask all of
this because I am just now preparing to work on Cymbeline, and have a
great number of questions to work through.

I should, finally, like to hear more about Peter Hadorn's theory of a
connection between the messengers in Antony & Cleopatra and the epistles
of St Paul.

Michael Ullyot
Clare College
Cambridge

Re: Horatio

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1251  Tuesday, 13 July 1999.

[1]     From:   Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 8 Jul 1999 22:37:48 +0300 (IDT)
        Subj:   Ho ratio

[2]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 11 Jul 1999 16:16:39 -0400
        Subj:   Horatio


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 8 Jul 1999 22:37:48 +0300 (IDT)
Subject:        Ho ratio

When did the word "rational", referring to logical thinking, enter the
English language?

Horatio seems to be around when clear thinking is needed.  Hamlet
recruits him in the plan to test the truth of the ghost's message.
Horatio is there to advise the Queen to pay heed to the power of the
populace and receive Ophelia, as  L. Swilley pointed out.  It is to Ho
ratio that Hamlet bequeathes the task of making sense, for the sake of
history, of the pile of corpses left on stage.  True, that Horatio was
intending to do something irrevocably emotional at the time, but let's
accept that he is not merely a theatrical device; he is human (within
the confines of the play) and at some extreme point we should allow his
emotion to overcome his capacity to reason. In the end he accedes to
Hamlet's request.

The aspirated "o" is the Greek definite article, whereas my dictionary
has ratio derived from Latin. Mixing languages does not fit my
impression of Shakespeare's integrity. Unfortunately I have little Latin
and less Greek.  Perhaps someone out there can confirm that "rational"
has Greek as well as Latin roots.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 11 Jul 1999 16:16:39 -0400
Subject:        Horatio

John Dover Wilson takes up the "inconsistencies" in the character (in
both senses) of Horatio in What Happens in Hamlet (232-36), and explains
them in terms of dramatic function.  But the unusually complex textual
and (presumptively) theatrical history of the play surely precludes
confident solutions to this as to other cruces of this most recalcitrant
drama.

Dave Evett

Shakespeare Reference in Current Film

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1249  Thursday, 8 July 1999.

From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 6 Jul 1999 13:39:55 CST6CDT
Subject:        Shakespeare Reference in Current Film

For those who keep track of such things: I saw The Red Violin (which I
recommend) this weekend, and at a critical moment the character played
by Greta Scacchi exclaims "savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust"
from sonnet 129.

Chris Gordon

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.