1999

Re: Midsummer Questions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1273  Thursday, 15 July 1999.

From:           Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 15:08:14 +0000
Subject: 10.1267 Re: Midsummer Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1267 Re: Midsummer Questions

Steve Urkowitz wrote that the role of Egeus seems to be one of those
played by Shakespeare.

In the Peter Hall production of "MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM" currently
playing in Los Angeles, the role of Egeus is played by an actor who is
made up to look like William Shakespeare.

(I don't recommend the production, The role of Oberon is played by an
actor who seems to be channeling Cyril Ritchard as Captain Hook.)

Middleton's The Cristall Sanctuary

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1272  Thursday, 15 July 1999.

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 07:20:45 PDT
Subject:        Middleton's The Cristall Sanctuary

Dear Listmembers:

I posted this on another Listserv and got nowhere with it. Forgive me
those of you who have seen this already.

Perhaps someone can help me with this. I thought I knew Thomas
Middleton's canon well. But in his edition of Coriolanus, Philip
Brockbank refers to an item supposed to be by Middleton: "an vnparaleld
Maister-peece of Art, called the Cristall Sanctuary, stilde by the of
the Temple of Integrity, where her Immaculate selfe with all her
glorious and Sanctimonious Concomitants sit transparently seene through
the Crystall" (introduction, page 35).  Unfortunately, Brockbank gives
no source for this quotation. Could anyone on this list tell me whether
this is a work by the dramatist or by another Thomas Middleton?  And is
there an extant copy of this work available? Is it a text or some other
kind of work? Your help will be appreciated.

Jack Heller
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Time in R&J

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1270  Wednesday, 14 July 1999.

From:           Marilyn Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 00:03:28 -0400
Subject: 10.1254: Time in R&J
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1254: Time in R&J

The time in R&J only works if you transpose "two and forty hours" to
"four and twenty hours" for J's coma.

Which could easily happen:

Mantua is a 1/2 day's ride from Verona, though whether or not
Shakespeare actually knew that I have no way of knowing.

Play starts Sun morning; party Sun night.  Wedding  Mon afternoon.  Same
re deaths.  It's Monday when Paris gets Juliet's hand... and it is so
very late that we may call it early by and by.   Wedding set for Thurs
and moved up to Wednesday.  J takes potion Tues night, put in tomb
shortly after 3 am Wed. morning.  Balthazar sees it, rides for Mantua;
Romeo rides back, arriving Wed. night.

The glooming peace that the morrow brings is Thurs. morning.

All these days come from the references between Capulet and Paris, then
moving forward and back from there, using references to "this afternoon"
and such phrases.

Only other possibility is a blank lapse of time from Wed. morning to
Thurs evening when Romeo arrives in Verona... and I don't believe, given
the incredibly rapid pace of the rest of the play, that Shakespeare
would have that large a gap.

So it all hinges on how long Juliet's potion works before it wears off.
Everything else but that fits.

Marilyn Bonomi

Re: Rap Antony

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1271  Thursday, 15 July 1999.

[1]     From:   Jefferson Cronin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 23:59:21 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

[2]     From:   Peter M. McCluskey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:13:11 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Willie The Shake

[3]     From:   Paul Lord <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:02:13 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

[4]     From:   Peter M. McCluskey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 10:47:18 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Lord Buckley Revisted

[5]     From:   Curtis Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:43:42 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

[6]     From:   J. Kenneth Campbell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:48:08 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

[7]     From:   Hermine Stover <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 10:00:57 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

[8]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 23:58:29 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jefferson Cronin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 23:59:21 +1000
Subject: 10.1268 Rap Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

Best guess;  I think--a memory flogger here--that was Steve Allen.

Jefferson Cronin
U of Maryland/Asia
Guam

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter M. McCluskey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:13:11 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Willie The Shake

Heather James asks about the source of "Hipsters, Flipsters, and Finger
poppin' daddies, knock me your lobes."  It's from Lord Buckley, the
1950's hipster comedian.  It continues something like this, "I come to
lay Caesar out, not to hip you to him.  The bad jazz that a cat blows
wails long after him; the groovy is often stashed with the frame.  So
don't put Caesar down....To swing, or not to swing-that is the
question!"  The intro to the piece is pretty funny-an appreciation of
Willie the Shake and some remarks about "Tony and Cleo swinging on the
Nile."

I have a reissue of Buckley's greatest hits on LP, although it is packed
away in anticipation of moving to Tennessee.  I imagine it's on CD by
now; I have a foggy notion that it's been reissued Rhino.

Where are my bongo drums?  Who wants espresso?

--Pete (Maynard G. Krebs) McCluskey

  Peter M. McCluskey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
  Department of English, University of New Orleans

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Lord <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:02:13 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 10.1268 Rap Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

Heather James asks:

>Since the subject of "rap" Antony has come up, there is an earlier
>hipster rendition of Antony's speech.  Does anyone out there know who
>did it?

Lord Buckley.  It was once available on "The Best of Lord Buckley" on
Elektra records, EKS-74047, but that seems to be out of print.  I have
it on "His Royal Hipness", Discovery Records #71001.

You can find out more than you ever wanted to know about his own hip
self at http://www.industrialhaiku.com/LBO/LBOPages/Welcome.html Buckley
was a real piece of work!

Paul

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter M. McCluskey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 10:47:18 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Lord Buckley Revisted

I just checked Amazon.com, and "Marc Antony's Funeral Oration" is
available on Lord Buckley's CD "His Royal Hipness"--a bargain at $11.49!

"To swing, or not to swing--that is the hang-up!"

Happy finger-poppin',

Pete

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Curtis Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:43:42 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 10.1268 Rap Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

The hipster version of Antony's speech is by the fabulous Lord
Buckley-who also did hipster versions of the story of Jesus ("The
Nazz"), The Gettysburg address, and (my favorite) Jonah and the Whale.
I know that at least some of his material is available on CD.

Curtis

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           J. Kenneth Campbell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 09:48:08 -0700
Subject: 10.1268 Rap Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

It was a Greenwich Village beatnik named Lord Byron.  It is more a
"beat" translation  then rap. It is a lot of fun.   He made two record
albums that I know of and he is fantastic.  His "Noah an the Whale" is
brilliant.

J. Kenneth Campbell

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hermine Stover <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 10:00:57 -0700
Subject: 10.1268 Rap Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

I have the complete works of this gentleman. Where? Ah! I will have to
search. His renderings of the bard directly into Jive was one of the
wonders of the past 3 decades. Maybe 4, I forgot. Will go look directly
I
believe it is in the Anthology of the Cool.

hermine

[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jul 1999 23:58:29 -0400
Subject: 10.1268 Rap Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1268 Rap Antony

It's by Lord Buckley

>Hipster, tricksters, and finger-popping daddies,
>Knock me your lobes.  I come to lay Caesar out,
>Not to hip you to him...

The bad jive a cat blows hangs out
The good is often stashed with his frame...

Something like that...from childhood memory

Clifford Stetner
www.columbia.edu/~fs10/cds.htm

Shakespeare vs. Shakespeare...

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1269  Wednesday, 14 July 1999.

From:           Chris Stroffolino <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 13 Jul 1999 19:18:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare vs. Shakespeare...

In a spirit of play (and also in questioning my own "commonplaces" which
I've noticed have, somewhat despite myself, become reified), would
anybody care to argue that TAMING OF THE SHREW is a BETTER play than,
say, A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM? I would very much love to hear arguments
(on either side) based on taste, ideology, whatever...

     Chris

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