1999

New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: NOVELLA.MEDIATOR

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1202  Wednesday, 30 June 1999.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, June 30, 1999
Subject:        New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: NOVELLA.MEDIATOR

As of today, SHAKSPEReans may retrieve "Passing from Play to Play: The
Novella as Mediator Between Italian and English Renaissance Drama"
(NOVELLA.MEDIATOR) by Charlotte Pressler
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Passing from Play to Play: The Novella as Mediator Between
 Italian and English Renaissance Drama



     This is an exploratory paper on a topic about which I continue to
have more questions than answers. It began, for me, with a consideration
of two contrasting approaches to comparative Renaissance drama, both of
which I find very useful. The newer of the two is sometimes called "new
structuralism"; the other is the more familiar discipline of theater
history. While "new structuralism" calls attention to similarities in
the stock plots and characters of Italian and English Renaissance drama,
theater historians point to the divergence in their theatrical
practices. A link between the two forms of drama is easy to sense but
hard to elucidate. I will suggest here that the genre of prose fiction
known as the novella was the mediator that not only transmitted Italian
dramas to England, but transformed them into the kinds of material that

the very different practices of the English public stages would find
"good to use."

New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: REVISED.OTHELLO

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1201  Wednesday, 30 June 1999.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, June 30, 1999
Subject:        New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: REVISED.OTHELLO

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(REVISED.OTHELLO) by Pervez Rizvi from the SHAKSPER fileserver.

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Evidence of Revision in Othello
by
Pervez Rizvi

[This article was published in Notes and Queries, vol. 45,
no. 3 (September 1998) and is reproduced here, with minor
changes, by permission of Oxford University Press. Numbers
in square brackets refer to end notes.]

Othello exists in two authoritative versions: the first
quarto (Q) published in 1622 and the Folio (F) of 1623.
Current scholarly opinion on the relationship between Q
and F is summarised thus in the Oxford Textual Companion
[1]:

"[Q] represents a scribal copy of foul papers.
F represents a scribal copy of Shakespeare's own revised
manuscript of the play.
F therefore brings us closer to Shakespeare's final text
than [Q].
[Q's] scribe obliterated fewer authorial characteristics
than F's."

Re: Tangent to Byron Comment

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1099  Wednesday, 30 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Andy White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 22:05:32 -0400
        Subj:   Tangent to Byron Comment

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 05:12:24 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1088 Re: Tangent to Byron Comment


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andy White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 22:05:32 -0400
Subject:        Tangent to Byron Comment

Having read a bit about Byron's private life, and in particular having
read some of the correspondence between himself and his wife (and other
sundry bits of informative stuff), it is pretty clear to me that Byron
was incestuous, and had a good number of other illegal (for the time)
appetites as well.

Brilliant poet, but I ask you, who can stand to read the whole of Don
Juan these days?  It's so incredibly indulgent, and filled
stabs-in-the-back for all his friends and kin.

Andy White
Arlington, VA

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 05:12:24 -0400
Subject: 10.1088 Re: Tangent to Byron Comment
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1088 Re: Tangent to Byron Comment

He is also reported to have said, in response to a compliment on his
hair:" Yes, it curls naturally every night."

He was wicked, but not a patch on our Will.

New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: CARRY.HOME

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1200  Wednesday, 30 June 1999.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, June 30, 1999
Subject:        New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: CARRY.HOME

As of today, SHAKSPEReans may retrieve "Carry This Island Home in His
Pocket": Buying and Selling Shakespeare (CARRY.HOME) by Geoff  Ridden
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************************************************************************
"Carry This Island Home in His Pocket": Buying and Selling Shakespeare

Geoff  Ridden

This chapter is concerned with the export of Shakespeare from the UK,
but, more particularly, with the re-exporting of Shakespeare from other
countries and its re-importing into the UK  It will address the
underlying questions of why Shakespeare should be traded at all, and
what kind of cultural assumptions are made in the process of this trade.

Re: Martius or Marcius

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1098  Wednesday, 30 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Douglas McQueen-Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 10:34:14 +1000
        Subj:   Martius or Marcius

[2]     From:   David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 19:13:05 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1089 Martius or Marcius


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas McQueen-Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 1999 10:34:14 +1000
Subject:        Martius or Marcius

Jack Heller writes:

>Is there a reason for preferring either Caius Marcius or Caius Martius
>as the original name for Coriolanus?

I have been wondering about that very question myself. Harry Levin's
Pelican edition uses 'Caius Marcius'. R.B. Parker's Oxford edition uses
'Caius Martius'. This latter edition includes the following explanation:
'Instead of correcting Plutarch's Marcius, Shakespeare retains North's
misspelling (also found in Holland's translation of Livy)'. (p. 168)

So, it seems that Plutarch used the spelling 'Martius', and North's
translation used 'Marcius'. I have not consulted a Folio facsimile,
though it sounds as though Shakespeare (or the compositors of
Coriolanus) used 'Marcius'.

If this is so, I wonder if there is a sufficient additional reason for
changing the name back from 'Marcius' to 'Martius'. The latter has a
more obvious military association, however this sounds like heavy-handed
editorial intervention to me.

And I am confused about pronunciation also. If the spelling was
'Martius', I would pronounce it (with Australian accent) as 'Mar -
shus', with two syllables. If the spelling was 'Marcius', I would say
'Mar - see - us', with three syllables. The BBC/Time-Life television
adaptation uses the pronunciation 'Mar - see - us'. Any further
explanation would be appreciated.

Cheers,
Douglas McQueen-Thomson

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 19:13:05 -0600
Subject: 10.1089 Martius or Marcius
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1089 Martius or Marcius

Jack Heller wrote:

>Is there a reason for preferring either Caius Marcius or Caius Martius
>as the original name for Coriolanus? I have found both forms in various
>editions of the play. I don't have a folio facsimile to consult on this
>question, but since the folio is the earliest extant copy of
>Coriolanus-the copy text for any edition, I'm not sure that consulting
>the folio would help. Why does Martius/Marcius vary among edition? And,
>by the way, how would one pronounce Marcius? Responses will be
>appreciated.

The Folio has "Martius" (following the spelling used in North's
Plutarch, Shakespeare's source), but the influential Lewis Theobald's
1727 edition changed this to "Marcius", a reading which has been
retained by some later editors.  Of the editions I have immediately at
hand, the Riverside, Arden, and the Norton retain the Folio's "Martius",
while the Penguin follows Theobald and has "Marcius".  I don't have the
Variorum handy to check, but my guess would be that as you go back into
the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries, the incidence of "Marcius"
would increase, since Theobald's influence was greater then.  But that's
just a guess; consult the Variorum (published in 1928) to be sure.

Dave Kathman
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