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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0926  Tuesday, 1 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Dale Coye <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 13:41:13 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0915 Richard II Pronunciation Question

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 18:28:31 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0920 Assorted Responses

[3]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 15:59:45 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0920 Assorted Responses

[4]     From:   M. Morford <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Jun 1999 06:16:45 +0800
        Subj:   The weight of legacies


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Coye <
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Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 13:41:13 EDT
Subject: 10.0915 Richard II Pronunciation Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0915 Richard II Pronunciation Question

I have to plug my book "Pronouncing Shakespeare's Words: A Guide from A
to Zounds" which came out this year from Greenwood.   It was written to
answer exactly this kind of question.   Barkloughly is based on
Holinshed's error for Hertlowli, now Harlech (which in its anglicized
pronunciation is /HAR leck/.  Some eds have Harlechly (HAR leck lee) as
a compromise position, but if you keep Barkloughly you have the option
of either /BARK leck lee,  BARK loh lee (which would be based on the
archaic Hertlowli) or /bark LECK lee, bark LOW lee/-- because the line
can be scanned with either an inverted or a normal first foot.

Dale Coye
Dept. of English
The College of New Jersey

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 18:28:31 -0400
Subject: 10.0920 Assorted Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0920 Assorted Responses

>Portia represents "old money" and
>the power old money asssumes it has to bend or break the rules whenever
>it wants.  Porita is really a kind of gatekeeper who lets in "the right
>sort" and keeps out "the riffraff."

So writes Ed Taft, and I'd like to add my two cents.  Several times in
the play Bassanio is called "Lord Bassanio" (e.g., 1.1.69), Antonio's
"most noble kinsman" (1.1.57).  One could assume that Bassanio is indeed
noble and that the title Lord actually indicates a place in the social
hierarchy. A marquess or anybody from the four lower grades of the
peerage is addressed (conventionally, of course) as "My Lord."  One
could further assume that when Portia marries Bassanio, she marries his
title, just as he marries her money.  Portia lives in Belmont with no
visible means of support, so we may assume that she has money, and does
not worry about making it.  But do we assume that her money comes from
capitalist ventures, or that Belmont is an aristoratic great house and
her wealth comes from traditional rents and obligations?  Is she buying
her way into the peerage, or is she already there?

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 15:59:45 +0000
Subject: 10.0920 Assorted Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0920 Assorted Responses

To whoever asked about a Shakespeare critic to read before translating
Merry Wives into Spanish:

Ron Huebert published a very good article on the play as a sophisticated
parody of a number of contemporary literary works, entitled "Levels of
Parody in The Merry Wives of Windsor," English Studies in Canada 3
(1977): 136-52.  I think that this essay would be very useful,
especially for anyone undertaking a translation.

Cheers,
Se

 

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