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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Assorted Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0932  Wednesday, 2 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Chantal Schutz <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Jun 1999 15:52:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0906 Pronunciation of Fortinbras

[2]     From:   Susan Gray <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Jun 1999 23:04:48 EDT
        Subj:   RE: Titles from Macbeth or Tempest

[3]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Jun 1999 18:34:28 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0924 Re: Various Hamlet Postings

[4]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Jun 1999 19:19:54 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0925 Shakespeare, Internet, Movies, and More

[5]     From:   Tal Carawan, Jr. <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Jun 1999 14:23:03 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0915 Richard II Pronunciation Question

[6]     From:   Reg Grouse <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 22:03:30 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0921 Trip to Stratford and London in August


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chantal Schutz <
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Date:           Tuesday, 01 Jun 1999 15:52:44 -0400
Subject: 10.0906 Pronunciation of Fortinbras
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0906 Pronunciation of Fortinbras

>While I won't quibble on meaning or French pronunciation, Hamlet's
>pronunciation of Fortinbras was most probably not French-consult the F1
>spelling: "Fortenbrasse."

Well, of course, French pronunciation in 1600 was rather different from
now too, and the F1 spelling exactly reflects the way a Frenchman would
have pronounced it then...

All the best,
Chantal

Shakespeare's Globe
University of Reading
Website: http://www.rdg.ac.uk/globe

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Gray <
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Date:           Tuesday, 1 Jun 1999 23:04:48 EDT
Subject:        RE: Titles from Macbeth or Tempest

Tanya,

Here are a pair of Canadian entries for you:

_Tempest Tost_ by Robertson Davies
_Give Sorrow Words_  by Marcy Holder (her journals and, sadly, out of
print)

Susan Gray

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 1 Jun 1999 18:34:28 +0100
Subject: 10.0924 Re: Various Hamlet Postings
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0924 Re: Various Hamlet Postings

>>Were black and red ink used to distinguish between debits and credits?
>>I thought it was positive and negative numbers, which is not the same
>>thing.

>To that much, Larry, I can say yes, on no authority but custom

>Carol Barton

--also if you go the Format/Cells area of Excel, and flag "Currency",
you're given a choice of style, including red-for-debit, negative for
debit, and red-and-negative for debit [a double-negative?].  So the
usage has survived even unto the electronic heights of Gatesworld.

But when +did+ it start?

Robin Hamilton

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 1 Jun 1999 19:19:54 +0100
Subject: 10.0925 Shakespeare, Internet, Movies, and More
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0925 Shakespeare, Internet, Movies, and More

>Actors in the Elizabethan era were considered immoral, akin to
>prostitutes and therefore a play would be considered an immoral
>recreation.  If this is so, then why where they so frequented?

I think this conflates two separate issues.  One is the LEGAL status of
players, who were technically "vagabonds", and had to be
'sponsored'-thus, The Admiral's Men, etc.

The other is the Puritan (MORAL) attacks on plays and players as
"immoral, akin to prostitutes"-brilliantly sent-up in the climax of Ben
Jonson's +Bartholomew Fair+.

Not all Elizabethans (and especially not Elizabeth) bought the Puritan
line.

Robin Hamilton.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tal Carawan, Jr. <
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Date:           Tuesday, 01 Jun 1999 14:23:03 -0400
Subject: 10.0915 Richard II Pronunciation Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0915 Richard II Pronunciation Question

Thank you, Dale for your thoughtful response on the pronunciation of
Barloughly...I settle on this name for the castle in Richard II (3.2)
vs. Harlech as 3 of my 4 texts have Barloughly, including my copy of the
folio (Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies : A
Facsimile of the First Folio 1623, edited by Doug Moston), which I
prefer to use as an actor.

Do you not consider the "lock" for loch or loughe, i.e. Bar-lock-lee? Or
"log?"  This is based on "loughe" being an Irish version of the Scottish
"loch," and my (Random House) dictionary offering a pronuciation
identical to "loch." It sounds like the "k" stays in "bark."  Dale's
versions are:

"if you keep Barkloughly you have the option of either /BARK leck lee,
BARK loh lee (which would be based on the archaic Hertlowli) or /bark
LECK lee, bark LOW lee/..."

While my first feeling was to go with "bar-LOCK-lee."   OK, so I'm
completely uncertain now.  Has anyone seen Richard II, and can remember
what was said, or does anyone have access to an audio recording?  I am
aware that there are two VHS editions about, but I do not access to
them, nor am I certain the castle name would even be mentioned.

I have considered calling it simply "Richard's Castle" and let it go at
that, or even picking up the monologue with "I weep for joy..."  The
second might be a weasel's choice, but the first might indeed be the
action of a king!  Any thought's on the below adaptation?

"Richard's Castle call you this at hand?
...
Needs must I like it well: I weep for joy..."

and I would emphasize the Richard to distinguish it as my kingly
interpretation of whatever castle name is mentioned to him.

Thanks again!

Tal Carawan, Jr.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Reg Grouse <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 22:03:30 +1000
Subject: 10.0921 Trip to Stratford and London in August
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0921 Trip to Stratford and London in August

Joe Conlon's request for knowledge about the Shakespeare Teachers
Conference at Stratford which was advertised for the beginning of August
has been cancelled for lack of support. Too bad!
 

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