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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Barklough-ing Up the Right Tree
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0936  Thursday, 3 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 10:42:36 -0400
        Subj:   Barklough-ing Up the Right Tree

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 16:02:53 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0932 Assorted Responses


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 10:42:36 -0400
Subject:        Barklough-ing Up the Right Tree

Whatever the correct pronunciation of the place for ordinary
geographical purposes, I don't think it could be Bark-Lock-Lee for
rhetorical purposes-just trying saying THAT three times fast!
Bark-LAWFF-Lee sounds great. You could almost sing it to "Maria" from
"West Side Story" (Bark-Lawff-Lee! I'll never stop saying
Bark-Lawff-Lee!). ("A little water clears us of this deed" scans to "I'm
gonna wash that man right out of my hair," which was pretty much the
plan.)
Dana Shilling

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 16:02:53 +0100
Subject: 10.0932 Assorted Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0932 Assorted Responses

>Do you not consider the "lock" for loch or loughe, i.e. Bar-lock-lee? Or
>"log?"  This is based on "loughe" being an Irish version of the Scottish
>"loch," and my (Random House) dictionary offering a pronuciation
>identical to "loch." It sounds like the "k" stays in "bark."

I don't know how relevant this is, but I live in a town called
Loughborough (in England) which the natives [and everyone else]
pronounce "Luffburrow".

The Shorter OED (on CD Rom), gives:

lough /lQk, lQx/ n.OE. [Ir. loch = Gael. LOCH n.1]

1 A lake, a pool. In early use also, a strait, a gulf. Now rare or obs.
OE.
2 In Ireland: a lake, an arm of the sea. LM

Robin Hamilton
 

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