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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Assorted Responses to Recent Posts
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0950  Monday, 7 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Michael Ullyot <
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        Date:   Sunday, 23 May 1999 20:42:53 +0100
        Subj:   Edward III

[2]     From:   Melissa D. Aaron <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Jun 1999 09:35:11 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0943 Responses

[3]     From:   Judith Craig <
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        Date:   Saturday, 5 Jun 1999 19:44:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Chooseth

[4]     From:   George Sapio <
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        Date:   Friday, 04 Jun 1999 23:55:34 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0927 "Protesting too much"

[5]     From:   Jack Heller <
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        Date:   Saturday 05 Jun 1999 14:05:30 PDT
        Subj:   The B and F Edition: An Update and a Survey


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Ullyot <
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Date:           Sunday, 23 May 1999 20:42:53 +0100
Subject:        Edward III

Elena Marine asks for information on Edward III, and I would begin by
directing her to Bill Godshalk's reading list from SHK 9.1104 (Sunday, 8
November 1998). There is indeed a recent (1998) edition of the play in
the New Cambridge Shakespeare series, edited with an exemplary
introduction by Giorgio Melchiori. Rather interesting, by the way, that
the Cleveland Shakespeare people chose to subtitle their play with "The
King and the Countess" (a nod to William Poel's production for the
Elizabethan Stage Society?), as I presume they are not intending to
produce only Act 2, as did Poel in 1911. Their subtitle does emphasise
the love plot (rather too much, I think), though this also happens to be
the section of the play most commonly attributed to Shakespeare.

Incidentally, this is not the first full-text professional production of
this play, as Elena (mis?)quotes Tim Perfect as saying. There were two
American productions in the 1980s, and the Welsh Theatr Clwyd production
in 1987 (analysed by Melchiori, 48f.).

What Bill Godshalk said in November must be repeated: this is hardly a
"new" attribution to Shakespeare, as controversies over various
apocryphal works are a very old story. Ed3 certainly deserves inclusion
in the canon, alongside The Two Noble Kinsmen, as an exemplar of
Elizabethan collaborative drama, and a wonderful history, anticipating
Henry V.

Michael Ullyot

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa D. Aaron <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Jun 1999 09:35:11 -0400
Subject: 10.0943 Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0943 Responses

>Talk about your teapot tempests!  I saw the production a week ago today
>(as I write).  It is perhaps a hair more scatological than Adrian
>Noble's production of three years ago, but just a hair.  I am stunned
>that Dream has such controversy when Othello in the same theater has
>simulated oral sex, and between men.  Heavens!  Tales From Ovid at the
>Swan is chock full of male nudity post intermission, and Valpone, also
>in the Swan, opens with the title character in bed with his dwarf,
>hermaphrodite, and eunuch, though everyone is clothed.

I know the situation in *Volpone*--but what's the context in *Othello*?
No one particular scene leaps to my mind for this kind of staging.

Melissa D.  Aaron
University of Michigan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Craig <
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Date:           Saturday, 5 Jun 1999 19:44:40 -0500
Subject:        Re: Chooseth

Ed Taft writes:

My point is that critics who see her as full of virtues see only part of
what she says and does. Larry Manley is right on target when he says,
following Engle, that the astute critic needs to "follow the money." If
we do so, then Portia fits into the play's emphasis on money and self
interest-which rules the world of MV.

I would argue from the woman's point of view that Portia loves her
father and respects his judgment: a point that Shakespeare seems to make
to me in that he provides a contrast to Portia in the counterplot with
the actions of Jessica.  She brings shame and distress to her father by
flippantly disregarding his views, his Jewish heritage, and his
hard-earned money.  She is selfish and stupid; Portia may be controlled,
but she asserts her inherited genes through her bravery in entering a
man's world and successfully rescuing her emotional life from equally
flippant manipulation by men-and enjoying herself in the process.

Judith M. Craig
Midland, TX

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           George Sapio <
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Date:           Friday, 04 Jun 1999 23:55:34 -0400
Subject: 10.0927 "Protesting too much"
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0927 "Protesting too much"

I believe the term is "propaganda"; according to the OED, "organized
scheme", "biased information.  It's the same all over; China, the US...

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
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Date:           Saturday 05 Jun 1999 14:05:30 PDT
Subject:        The B and F Edition: An Update and a Survey

Dear List Members:

You may recall from my previous postings my interest in having available
a trade paperback edition of plays by Francis Beaumont and John
Fletcher. I have corresponded via e-mail with the editors of a
well-known series of Renaissance drama texts, proposing such a volume
and suggesting that it could include The Knight of the Burning Pestle,
*The Faithful Shepherdess*, Philaster, and A King and No King. They
agreed with my belief that a B&F edition would be a valuable addition to
their booklist.  However, their publishers "seem to stay resolutely
unconvinced. They are, in their current financial circumstances, very
unwilling to take on volumes for which they cannot envisage a fairly
immediate and substantial financial return."

I think it may be possible to show that a B&F edition will indeed bring
a substantial financial return, at least as much as editions of Ford,
Webster, Marston, and Revenge Tragedies have brought. Therefore, I
invite responses from any interested person on this list to the
following questions, sent to my personal e-mail address (rather than to
SHAKSPER).

What plays by Beaumont and Fletcher do you wish were more readily
available?

Is your desire for these plays more for developing your personal library
or for your class instruction?

Would you use a trade paperback edition of B&F plays in your class
instruction? What would be the subject of the relevant courses?

What would be a likely enrollment for these courses?

Would these courses be regularly taught or would they be based on
special topics, taught once or twice?

Would you please give me your name, institutional affiliation, and
e-mail address?

May I use your name and affiliation in my future correspondence with the
editors or publishers for the sole purpose of defining the market
interest in a B&F edition?

Feel free to forward these questions to anyone not on this discussion
list who would be interested.

I promise to anyone who responds to these questions not to use
information you wish to keep confidential and to use information only
for the purposes describe above. I will not pass on e-mail addresses to
any company. The responses from anyone interested will be appreciated.

Jack Heller

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