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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Various
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0985  Friday, 11 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Matthew Steggle <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Jun 1999 16:37:07 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0970 Re: Gymnomacbeth

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Jun 1999 15:44:55 -0400
        Subj:   Bulwer

[3]     From:   William Sutton <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Jun 1999 05:40:47 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0960 Born to Hand Jive

[4]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Jun 1999 13:23:49 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0865  MND Plagarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Steggle <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Jun 1999 16:37:07 +0100 (BST)
Subject: 10.0970 Re: Gymnomacbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0970 Re: Gymnomacbeth

"The dancers have been forced to wear at least a G-string and pasties."

Can this be right?

To Brits, "pasties" are a sort of crusty version of a meat pie. Clearly
it means something different in Florida.

At least, I hope it does...

Cheers,
  Matt

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Jun 1999 15:44:55 -0400
Subject:        Bulwer

Bertram Joseph's "Acting Shakespeare" devotes a lot of space to
discussion of John Bulwer's Chironomia and Chirologia (both 1644), the
source of his illustrations. The two books "deal with the part played by
arm, hand and finers in that 'external action' which was so well
described as a 'shadow of affections', that is, an image of emotions"
(Joseph p. 91); the next passage is "There is no need to be afraid that
the rhetoricians will lead us astray in our search for information on
the expressing of emotion in stage-playing".  At p. 97, Joseph says "The
gestures of the hand and arm discussed and illustrated by John Bulwer
belong among the parts of an excellent orator which the rhetoricians
took over from the actors"-i.e., Joseph's contention is that Elizabethan
orators and actors used a common vocabulary of signs.

Contemporary sign language used by/to communicate with deaf people stems
from an 18th century interest in systematizing deaf people's folk sign
language, so while Bertram Joseph could derive a gestural vocabulary
from American or English Sign Language, John Bulwer could not.

Dana Shilling

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Sutton <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Jun 1999 05:40:47 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 10.0960 Born to Hand Jive
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0960 Born to Hand Jive

Doesn't Bertram's list of illustrations date from circa 1640's? This
subject interests me and I also thought Bertram's  or rather Bulwer's
chironomia was fascinating when I first encountered them. Has anyone
translated the Latin titles by the way? There is, as far as I know, no
conventional agreement on these being Elizabethan gestures, except
Bertram's inference, is there? Is it also not contrary to the Dane's
admonition and advice to the players? Is there a whole rhetorical
symbolism comparable to the ballet gestes you propose as similar
missing?

What is this lost silent language idea? Monks, throat disease victims
etc. Can you expand? I live in Europe and yes gesture is very handy in
countries where my other languages are useless. Is this really evidence?

Yours in words on gestures,
William S.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Jun 1999 13:23:49 -0400
Subject: 10.0865  MND Plagarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0865  MND Plagarism

I want to thank everyone who helped me identify the essay my plagiarist
copied. The answer is: James Calderwood, "Anamorphism and Theseus'
Dream," SQ 42 (1991): 409-30, although my plagiarist used only portions
of the central section.  First prize goes to N. R. Moschovakis who sent
me the reference offline.  Sorry to take so long acknowledging your kind
help.

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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