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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Re: Pasties
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1002  Tuesday, 15 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Tom Dale Keever <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 1999 00:30:31 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Pasties

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 1999 10:12:45 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties

[3]     From:   Andy White <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 1999 10:37:45 -0400
        Subj:   Pasties, anyone?

[4]     From:   Kristine F. Batey <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 1999 13:14:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties

[5]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 1999 16:49:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties

[6]     From:   C. David Frankel <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 1999 20:12:48 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 1999 00:30:31 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Pasties

Dave Kathman's distinction between British "pasty" pronounced to rhyme
with "nasty," and American "pasty," which rhymes with "tasty," is
correct, but he errs when he says:

> The British "pasties" are completely unknown in the U.S.,
>where the term refers to a small patch worn over a woman's
>(usually a stripper's) nipples,

Surely during his time in Michigan he must have encountered the British,
or more precisely Cornish, meat pies.  They are very common in the Upper
Peninsula where they were introduced by Cornwall men who came over to
work in the copper mines and found them the ideal packed lunch to take
down in the pit.  I saw "Pasty stands" as far south as Grand Rapids
while I was in school at MSU.

Tom Dale Keever

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 1999 10:12:45 -0400
Subject: 10.0996 Re: Pasties
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties

>Ah, transatlantic language differences strike again.  The British
>"pasties" are completely unknown in the U.S. . . .

writes Dave Kathman.

And, actually, this is untrue.  Where I grew up in eastern Pennsylvania,
pasties were and are still eaten daily.  There are pasty shops, and the
locals argue over who makes the best ones.  And I hear tell that they
also make them in upper Michigan.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andy White <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 1999 10:37:45 -0400
Subject:        Pasties, anyone?

In the UK, the pies in question are pronounced "pah-stees", whereas the
preferred piece of stripper gear in the US is pronounced "pay-stees."  A
recipe show on Public Radio began once with a brief, giggle-laden
discussion of the differences in pronunciation and meaning ...

They are, indeed, different.  But has anyone told you about the donut
shop in Broward County, Florida that features topless waitresses?  A
sure sign, if any, that Floridians are utterly hypocritical when it
comes to their morals ...

Andy White
Nowhere near Florida, thank goodness.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kristine F. Batey <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 1999 13:14:54 -0500
Subject: 10.0996 Re: Pasties
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties

Matthew Steggle wrote:
>
>>"The dancers have been forced to wear at least a G-string and pasties."
>>
>>Can this be right?
>>
>>To Brits, "pasties" are a sort of crusty version of a meat pie. Clearly
>>it means something different in Florida.
>>

and Dave Kathman replied:
>Ah, transatlantic language differences strike again.  The British
>"pasties" are completely unknown in the U.S., where the term refers to a
>small patch worn over a woman's (usually a stripper's) nipples . . .

Actually, the British pasties can be found in the U.S. Great Lakes
region in several Wisconsin and Michigan communities that were heavily
settled by Cornish immigrants. The foodstuff "pasty" is pronounced with
the same short "a" as is in the word "past" (or sometimes with the "ah"
sound made by the "o" in "hot", whereas the nipple coverings are
pronounced with the long "a" of "paste" (because they're pasted on). The
pie-type pasties are a favorite item at Renaissance fairs, where the use
of the long "a" and any attendant snickering are considered to be
declass

 

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