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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Re: Pasties
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1012  Wednesday, 16 June 1999.

[1]     From:   David Kathman <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Jun 1999 09:08:02 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1002 Re: Pasties

[2]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Jun 1999 08:47:08 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 10.1002 Re: Pasties

[3]     From:   Rosalind C.King <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 10:33:50 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1002 Re: Pasties


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <
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Date:           Tuesday, 15 Jun 1999 09:08:02 -0500
Subject: 10.1002 Re: Pasties
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1002 Re: Pasties

Tom Dale Keever wrote:

> Dave Kathman's distinction between British "pasty" pronounced to rhyme
> with "nasty," and American "pasty," which rhymes with "tasty," is
> correct, but he errs when he says:
>
> > The British "pasties" are completely unknown in the U.S.,
> >where the term refers to a small patch worn over a woman's
> >(usually a stripper's) nipples,
>
> Surely during his time in Michigan he must have encountered the British,
> or more precisely Cornish, meat pies.  They are very common in the Upper
> Peninsula where they were introduced by Cornwall men who came over to
> work in the copper mines and found them the ideal packed lunch to take
> down in the pit.  I saw "Pasty stands" as far south as Grand Rapids
> while I was in school at MSU.

Bill Godshalk wrote:

> >Ah, transatlantic language differences strike again.  The British
> >"pasties" are completely unknown in the U.S. . . .
>
> writes Dave Kathman.
>
> And, actually, this is untrue.  Where I grew up in eastern Pennsylvania,
> pasties were and are still eaten daily.  There are pasty shops, and the
> locals argue over who makes the best ones.  And I hear tell that they
> also make them in upper Michigan.

Andy White wrote:

> In the UK, the pies in question are pronounced "pah-stees", whereas the
> preferred piece of stripper gear in the US is pronounced "pay-stees."  A
> recipe show on Public Radio began once with a brief, giggle-laden
> discussion of the differences in pronunciation and meaning ...
>
> They are, indeed, different.  But has anyone told you about the donut
> shop in Broward County, Florida that features topless waitresses?  A
> sure sign, if any, that Floridians are utterly hypocritical when it
> comes to their morals ...

Kristine F. Batey wrote:

> Actually, the British pasties can be found in the U.S. Great Lakes
> region in several Wisconsin and Michigan communities that were heavily
> settled by Cornish immigrants. The foodstuff "pasty" is pronounced with
> the same short "a" as is in the word "past" (or sometimes with the "ah"
> sound made by the "o" in "hot", whereas the nipple coverings are
> pronounced with the long "a" of "paste" (because they're pasted on). The
> pie-type pasties are a favorite item at Renaissance fairs, where the use
> of the long "a" and any attendant snickering are considered to be
> declass

 

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