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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Help Locating Missing Digests
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1030  Thursday, 17 June 1999.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Thursday, June 17, 1999
Subject:        Help Locating Missing Digests

Apparently, when we migrated the SHAKSPER list and files from the
University of Toronto to Bowie State University in late 1995 and early
1996, we lost two logs of digests. Without going into a lot of boring
details, I wonder if anyone has somewhere saved (either electronically
or as a printout) any of these digests 6.0899 to 6.0925 from Wednesday,
November 15, 1995 to Tuesday, November 27, 1995. If you happen to have
any of them, would you please send them to me so that I can try to
reconstruct the missing logs. Below is the last digest from SHAKSPER
LOG9511B and the first digest in SHAKSPER LOG9511E; what I am looking
for is anything in between.

Thanks,
Hardy

**********
Date:         Tue, 14 Nov 1995 11:16:35 EST
Reply-To:     Shakespeare Electronic Conference
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From:         "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: Re: Curse; Grad Conference; Ngaio Marsh; Queer
Comment:      SHK 6.0897  Re: Curse; Grad Conference; Ngaio Marsh; Queer
Theory

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0897.  Tuesday, 14
November 1995.

(1)     From:   Jung Jimmy <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 95 16:38:00 PST
        Subj:   Re: Curse

(2)     From:   William Proctor Williams 
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 95 18:19 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0894  Re: Grad Conference

(3)     From:   C. David Frankel <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 1995 18:31:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Ngaio Marsh

(4)     From:   Robert Dennis <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 08:17:56 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0895  Queer Theory


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jung Jimmy <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 95 16:38:00 PST
Subject:        Re: Curse

In response to Stephen J. Gagen and Rick Robinson; a Washington Post
article 2
or 3 Sundays ago revisited the curse of the Scottish play in the
aftermath of a
recent production and could report nothing sinister.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams 
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Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 95 18:19 CST
Subject: 6.0894  Re: Grad Conference
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0894  Re: Grad Conference

Sorry about that, I was just posting a file sent to me by a grad.
student. The
conference is 28-30 March 1996.  Write to the address in the
announcement about
further details.

WPW

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 1995 18:31:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Ngaio Marsh

[This was forwarded by C. David Frankel from the THEATRE list. --HMC]

Ngaio Marsh was also a fine theatre director, both in London and in her
native
New Zealand. She founded the Canterbury University Drama Dept. in
Christchurch,
NZ, training some good people for the London stage as as locally. She
was also
a very insightful performance reviewer -- I was on the receiving end a
couple
of times -- and was much in demand for NZ radio and TV.  I've never
forgotten
her Twelfth Night production which she wrote up in an early issue of
Shakespeare Survey.  It's nice to do homage to a famous lady who also
wrote
great detective novels.

Margaret Loftus Ranald.

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Dennis <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 08:17:56 -0500
Subject: 6.0895  Queer Theory
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0895  Queer Theory

For Robert Applebaum, particularly:

I did not submit my question about queer theory with "bitter
'ressentiment'".
I am honestly unfamiliar with the term and sought either verification
that it
was what it sounded like vernacularly, i.e., the theory of queers, or
clarification of a possibly specialized terminology.  Since only Stuart
Rice's
clarification has come forth, I assume "queer theory" indeed deals with
homosexuality.  Just because I consider something like "queer theory" to
be a
rather crude expression for academic language, why, Mr. Applebaum,
attribute
bitterness to me?  I would feel similarly about an area of study
designated
"cripple theory", or any of a dozen other slang expressions.  Scholars
should
be able to come up with a term which is both more accurate and more
appropriate, since the adjective "queer" is more emotionally tagged than
it is
precise, and you don't even want to begin worrying with the
uncertainties in
its use as a noun.

I appreciate your several suggestions for following up on gender studies
and
gender criticism.  I might suggest advocates and explorers of gender
studies
also read _Eve's Rib_ by Robert Poole.  BTW, you did achieve the
"thickly"
which you sought.

Sincerely,
Bob Dennis

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 ========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 14 Nov 1995 11:23:09 EST
Reply-To:     Shakespeare Electronic Conference
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From:         "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: Qs: Production Lists Project; *Shr.* Irony
Comment:      SHK 6.0898  Qs: Production Lists Project; *Shr.* Irony

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0898.  Tuesday, 14
November 1995.

(1)     From:   Michael Swanson <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 1995 21:29:34 -0500
        Subj:   Production Lists Project

(2)     From:   Bernie Folan <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 16:12:00 gmt
        Subj:   Irony at close of The Taming of the Shrew


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Swanson <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 1995 21:29:34 -0500
Subject:        Production Lists Project

Please excuse cross-posting, as well as the length of this message.

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to ask your help with a research project that I believe
could be
of substantial service to the American educational theatre community,
and
indeed to the theatre community as a whole.  Please take a few minutes
to read
my request and to respond by mailing back the enclosed card.

From the late 1940s through the mid-1970s, various theatre scholars
directed a
survey of college and university theatre productions known as the
Production
Lists Project.  Under the auspices of the old American Educational
Theatre
Association and American Theatre Association, lists of plays produced
were
annually collected, arranged into useful lists (i.e., ranking the most
produced
plays, musicals, playwrights, and one-acts), and printed in the
Educational
Theatre Journal  (now Theatre Journal ).  The project last saw
publication in
1976.

A paper given by Rick Jones at the 1994 Association for Theatre in
Higher
Education (ATHE) conference on the subject of theatre production seasons
inspired me to consider compiling the titles of college and university
plays
produced, so as to provide the field with a much better picture of
educational
theatre production in the United States than is now available.  Are
colleges
and universities producing more recent or original plays than in the
past, as
some have suggested in recent years?  Are there fewer Shakespearean
productions?  More Moli=E8re or Marivaux?  Fewer musicals?  More plays
by
people of color or by women?  Only such a survey can truly give us such
information, which might also allow us to develop a better overall
picture of
national educational theatre production trends. My hope is that the
production
information, which will be compiled with the File Maker Pro software
program,
might eventually be made available to researchers and to members of the
field
through journal publication and through Internet access to the database.

To begin this project, my home institution, Franklin College, has
awarded me a
grant to fund the initial setup of and the first year's operating costs
for
such a project.  At its April 1995 meeting, the ATHE Board of Governors
stated
its support for the concept of such a study, in terms of its potential
usefulness to the field.  The next step is up to you.  Please send me a
list of
the plays your United States university, college, or conservatory
theatre
program produced in the 1994 - 95 academic season, including the summer
of
1995.  Mailing me a season brochure by surface mail, if it's still an
accurate
record of your season, is a perfectly appropriate way to submit these
titles.
Please indicate whether any of these plays were musicals, one-acts,
original
works, or plays by people of color or by women.  If you send by e-mail,
I will
acknowledge receipt of the information.  If things go well, you will
receive a
similar request, by e-mail, next and subsequent summers.

Thanks for the time you've taken to read this, and, I hope, to respond
to my
request.  I look forward to hearing from you, and to eventually
providing you
with a better picture of American educational theatre production than
has been
available to us since 1976 .

Yours truly,
Michael Swanson
Chair, Fine Arts Department

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernie Folan <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 16:12:00 gmt
Subject:        Irony at close of The Taming of the Shrew

I am working on how to approach the following question - How ironical is
Katherine's last speech in relation to the play as a whole?

My problem is that I'm not quite sure whether I should read this as

1) Does K mean what she says about the qualities of a good wife or is
she being
ironic? or

2) How ironical this final speech is in that it marks a complete change
in her
attitudes from the start of the play.

Is Katherine a changed woman or is she a newly aware woman giving tips
to the
new wives she is speaking to?  Is the irony in her change or in her
realising
what the change *should* be for a wife?

When I studied the play the fact that Katherine had changed into a
submissive
wife was a given - I'm not now sure that she has.  Perhaps she's just
learned
what she needs to do to be a "good" wife (as learned in the sun/moon
scene).  I
don't want any answers - I'm quite happy to do that part. Just ideas on
the
source of the irony being questioned to help me with my approach.

Bernie Folan <
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=============================================================

THIS IS THE POINT AT WHICH I AM MISSING DIGESTS.

=============================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Nov 1995 13:16:05 EST
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Sender:       Shakespeare Electronic Conference
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From:         "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: Ian McKellen's *R3*
Comment:      SHK 6.0926  Ian McKellen's *R3*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0926.  Wednesday, 29 Nov.
1995.

(1)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 15:57:42 -0600
        Subj:   SHAKSPER 921: McKellen's *Richard*

(2)     From:   David Kathman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 01:07:03 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Ian McKellen and Richard III

(3)     From:   David G. Hale <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 95 11:27:18 EST
        Subj:   re: SHAKSPER: SHK 6.0921 Ian McKellens *R3*


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 15:57:42 -0600
Subject:        SHAKSPER 921: McKellen's *Richard*

Here's the information compliments of *Movienet*
(http://www.movienet.com/index.html); the film is scheduled to open on
December
22.

This compelling story of power and political intrigue portrays Richard
as
England's most ruthless monarch, a charismatic malcontent who accedes to
the
throne through a delicious mix of treachery, seduction and murder.
However,
this intriguing adaptation is offered with a distinctive twist. Taking
the
characters and action out of Elizabethan times, the story is set in an
imagined
London of the 1930s. Richard speaks his famous lines as Shakespeare
wrote them,
even as he conquers the throne with media sav vy, black-shirted thugs
and heavy
artillery.

Great Britain's foremost contemporary Shakespearean actor, Ian McKellen,
tackles one of Shakespeare's richest and most challenging roles in this
unique
screen version of the Bard's RICHARD III.

The illustrious cast also features Academy Award nominee Annette Bening
as
Queen Elizabeth; Academy Award nominee Robert Downey Jr. as her brother,
Earl
Rivers; Academy Award winner Maggie Smith as Richard's mother, the
Dutchess of
York; and academy Award nominee Nigel Hawthorne as his tragically
manipulated
brother, Clarence.

Cast: IAN McKELLEN, ANNETTE BENING, ROBERT DOWNEY, JR., MAGGIE SMITH,
NIGEL
HAWTHORNE
Director: RICHARD LONCRAINE
Producer: LISA KATSELAS PARE, STEPHEN BAYLY
Screenplay: IAN McKELLEN, RICHARD LONCRAINE
Based on a play by: WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
Director of Photography: PETER BIZIOU
Editor: PAUL GREEN
Costume Designer: SHUNA HARWOOD

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 01:07:03 +0100
Subject:        Re: Ian McKellen and Richard III

Laura Blanchard wrote:

>Has anyone heard much of anything about the forthcoming film version of
>*Richard III* with Sir Ian McKellen in the title role?
>
>I maintain the Richard III Society/American Branch web site and am looking for
>some information on the production to post in the appropriate section -- or,
>alternatively, for other pages to link to.

The movie is being released in the U.S. on December 22, and is directed
by
Richard Loncraine.  In addition to McKellen as Richard, it stars Annette
Bening
as Queen Elizabeth, Robert Downey Jr. as Earl Rivers, Maggie Smith as
the
Duchess of York, and Nigel Hawthorne as Clarence. The 'hook' is that
this
production is set in the England of the 1930s; it sounds potentially
interesting.

The web site for this movie is at:

  http://www.cm.cf.ac.uk/M/title-exact?1176DE

It has all the information I gave above, plus more.

Dave Kathman

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David G. Hale <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 95 11:27:18 EST
Subject: SHK 6.0921 Ian McKellens *R3*
Comment:        re: SHAKSPER: SHK 6.0921 Ian McKellens *R3*

In response to Laura Blanchard's query about the forthcoming film of
Richard
III with Ian McKellan. The New York Times on 9/17/95 has some material
about
this (as well as Branagh's Othello and others), (2:1, 18). The film
derives
from a National Theatre production of 1990, which subsequently toured
North
America and was well received by reviewers. The Times includes a still
of John
Wood as Edward IV and Annette Bening as Queen Elizabeth. The film is set
in
England of the 1930's, against the background of the abdication of
Edward VIII
and the rise of fascism. The film is supposed to open in the United
States on a
limited basis in December (for Oscar nominations) and be more widely
distributed in January.
 ========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Nov 1995 13:51:21 EST
Reply-To:     Shakespeare Electronic Conference
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Sender:       Shakespeare Electronic Conference
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From:         "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: Re: Soliloquies; Robert Stephens; *Shr.*
Comment:      SHK 6.0927  Re: Soliloquies; Robert Stephens; *Shr.*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0927.  Wednesday, 29 Nov.
1995.

(1)     From:   W. Russell Mayes, Jr." <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 10:52:10 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0922  Re: Soliloquies;

(2)     From:   Thomas G. Bishop <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 11:27:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Robert Stephens

(3)     From:   Charles Boyle <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 17:29:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   shrew


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. Russell Mayes, Jr." <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 10:52:10 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0922  Re: Soliloquies;
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0922  Re: Soliloquies;

Regarding "To be or not to be," the real question might be whether it is
accurate to call it a soliloquy.  Most of Shakespeare's soliloquies
occur when
a character is alone on-stage.  They would not have to (since soliloquy
means
speaking to oneself), but since most of his are of this type, it might
be
better simply to call the most famous soliloquy a major speech instead.
Then
there would be no problem having Ophelia, Claudius or Polonius overhear
it.
Another point, which I am sure has already been made, is that the
textual
condition of this scene, and _Hamlet_ in general, is a mess and thus it
is
difficult to know the relationship between this speech and the ensuing
discussion with Ophelia.

W. Russell Mayes, Jr.
University of North Carolina at Asheville

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas G. Bishop <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 11:27:12 -0500
Subject:        Re: Robert Stephens

In re Robert Stephens list of performances, I dont recall seeing it
mentioned
that he was also Polixenes in the BBC version of WT, nor, and more
importantly,
that he was in the NT Cottesloe's version of "The Mysteries" back in
1986,
which is also available on video. In that deeply wonderful sequence, he
first
plays Herod, and then outHerods himself as Sir Pilate. I thoroughly
recommend
them for anyone interested in how the ambience of medieval drama can be
fused
with modern working-class culture, or indeed for anyone interested in
the
resources of the modern theater.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Boyle <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 17:29:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        shrew

If it's dangerous to speculate on the author's intentions I'll just have
to
risk it. One of the ways I work with these scripts is as a director and
I've
found they are awfully funny if you at least try to hear the line the
way the
author heard it. In the theater, if you're going to bring the play to
life, you
can't afford the theory that this can't be done. If the actors don't get
the
joke, there's no way they can tell it to the audience - and then you
have to
fall back on a lot of yelling and running around to put the show across.
So my
issue is not to be right, but to find the truth of a scene. If I'm
wrong, I
change my mind.

So I agree Shakespeare is one of the most ironic writers going, but that
ability to stand back and laugh at the things he most cherishes doesn't
mean he
doesn't believe in those things. If this author doesn't believe in love
and
truth - truth is one of his words for God - he's got me fooled.

I certainly agree Katharina is playing a game with Petruchio in the
"sun\moon...budding virgin" exchanges, but I think it's something they
are now
playing together. I remember at the beginning of their courtship when he
covered her protests with the excuse that "Tis bargin'd 'twixt us twain,
being
alone, That she shall still be curst in company." Good joke. So now, no
longer
curst in company, what is she like when they're alone? Still the
contrary?
Another good joke. Find the humor and you've usually found the hurt and
humanity in the scene.

This "you lie and I'll swear to it" intimacy does have a disturbing echo
in
some of the closing sonnets, 147 or 152 for example, which could be
mined for
the dark side of such a union. In these it is clear Shakespeare has been
in
Katharina's shoes before someone - the Dark Lady one would suppose - but
what
he objects to is not the submission but the betrayal.

But that's the Sonnets. Shrew, for all its Punch and Judy rough-house,
is a
hopeful romantic comedy about a good match. If Katharina's being
sarcastic here
and he can't hear it, he's too dumb for her and there goes the hope.

To me a sour ending for Shrew falls short of what the show can deliver.
At the
very worst they deserve each other, even better, they tame each other.
Best of
all they've discovered the real thing, her final speech showing him the
way.
Katharina can always put such spine in her offering that he and we can
be
assured the shrew will return should he break the faith. But say she's
mocking
him already or truly broken now and this marriage is crap from the
get-go and
Shakespeare merely a cynic.

Charles Boyle
 ========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Nov 1995 13:56:19 EST
Reply-To:     Shakespeare Electronic Conference
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Sender:       Shakespeare Electronic Conference
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From:         "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job
Comment:      SHK 6.0928  *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0928.  Wednesday, 29 Nov.
1995.

(1)     From:   E. Pearlman <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 11:24:55 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   *Ham.* in Hollywood

(2)     From:   Jung Jimmy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 10:24:00 PST
        Subj:   The Lunatic, The Lover  and The Poet

(3)     From:   Kurt Daw <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 09:58:35 EST
        Subj:   Position Announcement


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           E. Pearlman <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 11:24:55 -0600 (MDT)
Subject:        *Ham.* in Hollywood

SHAKSPERians will want to read the very amusing and also sad essay by
David
Remnick in the NEW YORKER for Nov. 30 called "Hamlet in Hollywood."  It
features well-known Shakespearians.  But I would suggest that for the
full joy
of the experience, people should read or re-read Raymond F. Waddington's
essay
"Lutheran Hamlet" in ELN 1989,27-39.

E. Pearlman

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jung Jimmy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 10:24:00 PST
Subject:        The Lunatic, The Lover  and The Poet

I was fishing for reviews of Brian Bedford in The Lunatic, The Lover
and The
Poet.  My mom got a flyer and was trying to decide if she would find it
interesting.

jimmy

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kurt Daw <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 09:58:35 EST
Subject:        Position Announcement

Because of the heavy Shakespearean component of the production aspect of
this
job it may be of interest to SHAKSPER members:

Faculty Position
Theater Generalist

Kennesaw State College, a progressive metropolitan college in the
University
System of Georgia, invites applications for a tenure-track position in
the
theater program in the Department of Music and Performing Arts.  Located
on an
attractive campus northwest of Atlanta, the college enrolls 12,000
students in a
broad array of high quality undergraduate and graduate programs.

KSC has established a notable record for the inclusion of minorities and
women
in its educational mission and strongly encourages applications from
both
groups.

Qualifications/Responsibilities: M.F.A. or Doctorate in theater or
appropriate
related field.  Faculty member will teach in small department
specializing in
contemporary approaches to pre-modern literature in scholarship and
production.
Primary responsibilities will be 1) to teach an innovative Introduction
to
Theater course in the general education core, and 2) to teach
Contemporary
Theater Arts, an introduction to the major and the profession. In
addition,
undergraduate teaching expertise in theater history, dramaturgy, and
play
analysis is desirable. Experience or demonstrated potential to direct
pre-modern
literature (particularly Shakespeare) required.  Position requires
strong skills
in undergraduate liberal arts education, ability to work as a team
member and
interest in college and community service.  Departmental service
commitments
will include extensive support for Classic TheaterWorks, the campus
production
company.  Involvement with Classic TheaterWorks publications, public
relations
and educational outreach efforts are an integral part of the job.
Computer
skills (especially Macintosh) a plus. Rank and salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications.  Position available September 1996.

Application Instructions:  Applications will be accepted until position
is
filled.  To guarantee consideration, send a letter of application, vita,
official transcripts and three references (names, addresses, telephone
numbers)
by February 15, 1996 to : Kurt Daw, Chair, Theater Search Committee,
Department
of Music and Performing Arts, Kennesaw State College, 1000 Chastain
Road,
Kennesaw, Georgia 30144-5591.  FAX (770) 423-6368.  The committee also
welcomes
supporting materials, including examples of teaching materials,
demonstrations
of computer skills, production photographs, and scholarly and popular
dramaturgical articles.
 

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