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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Re: Pasties
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1032  Friday, 18 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Jun 1999 12:06:39 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1022 Re: Pasties

[2]     From:   Kristine F. Batey <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Jun 1999 10:49:16 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Pasties


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Jun 1999 12:06:39 +0100
Subject: 10.1022 Re: Pasties
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1022 Re: Pasties

>The food, a meal wrapped in pastry for the
>convenience of miners, was brought to the
>area by Cornish miners who moved to the area
>to work in the copper and iron mines.

The thick crusted seam running along the semicircular edge of the pie
was not to be eaten but to be held by the dirty-handed miner so the main
part could remain clean. Three-quarters of the interior was meat and
potato and the last quarter was jam so the whole thing constituted two
courses.

(I didn't get this from apocryphal email.)

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kristine F. Batey <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Jun 1999 10:49:16 -0500
Subject:        Re: Pasties

Rosalind King wrote

>Fascinating to read foreigners writing about one's own pronunciation
>with such authority.
>
>I alternate between pasty (with the a as in 'cat') and paste-y. OED in
>fact lists both. No-one I know (except poor old Prince Charles
>perhaps?!) would say 'pahsty'.

Actually, I think we were all writing about OUR pronunciation of the
word, or at least the pronunciation we hear on this side of the pond,
rather than the arguably definitive British pronunciation. For the
record, I've only heard "pahsty" at the local Renaissance fair (in
Bristol, WI, on the Illinois/Wisconsin border). In the small towns in
Wisconsin and Michigan where the pasty is on short-order menus, the
pronunciation is the rhymes-with-nasty one, with that very distinctive
upper-Midwestern short "a".

Kristine Batey  
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Northwestern University
Evanston, Illinois, USA
 

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