Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Re: Future of the Classics
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1045  Tuesday, 22 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Judith Craig <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 21 Jun 1999 10:24:06 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.1041 Re: Future of the Classics

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 21 Jun 1999 19:16:02 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1041 Re: Future of the Classics


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Craig <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 21 Jun 1999 10:24:06 -0500
Subject: Re: Future of the Classics
Comment:        SHK 10.1041 Re: Future of the Classics

I was wondering, as someone who loves Shakespeare and who is trying to
read him in terms of the Greek and Latin classics, why we associate
classical learning with memorization?  I must confess that I can't read
Greek or Latin and that he could, but I ENJOY reading them and puzzling
out his transformations of them.  Should we be denied this pleasure
because we are more illiterate than he (supposedly) was or because we
are intimidated by the "classics establishment?"

Judy Craig
email:  
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 21 Jun 1999 19:16:02 +0100
Subject: 10.1041 Re: Future of the Classics
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1041 Re: Future of the Classics

>Rather than provide anecdotal instances from my own childhood
and thus
>invite sneers, I shall just say that I have always found the
ability to
>quote accurately and well to be one of the distinguishing
>characteristics of anyone, of any culture and background, who
rightly
>calls herself cultured.

I must fail this test, as (unless I look it up) tend to misremember
III,iv,126 of +The Changeling+ (A woman dipp'd in blood, and talk of
modesty) as "A woman steeped in blood, and prate of modesty."

Robin Hamilton
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.