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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Re: Topcliffe, Ruy Lopez
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1056  Thursday, 24 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Tim Brookes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Jun 1999 08:25:05 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1048 Re: Topcliffe, Ruy Lopez

[2]     From:   Tom Dale Keever <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Jun 1999 16:34:47 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Roderigo and Ruy Lopez


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tim Brookes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 22 Jun 1999 08:25:05 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1048 Re: Topcliffe, Ruy Lopez
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1048 Re: Topcliffe, Ruy Lopez

> For Topcliffe, you might want to check out *The Reckoning* by Charles
> Nicholl, on the death of Christopher Marlowe.


Thanks a lot. I'll look into it right away.

Tim

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <
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Date:           Tuesday, 22 Jun 1999 16:34:47 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Roderigo and Ruy Lopez

Tim Brookes asks about the "Ruy Lopez affair" and wonders

>is the chess gambit named after the same Dr. Lopez?

I assume you mean the affair of Dr. Roderigo Lopez, who was executed in
1594, implicated in a supposed plot to murder Queen Elizabeth.  William
Camden wrote about in his seventeenth century biography of the Queen and
Anne Somerset's recent biography discusses it with excellent references
to contemporary accounts.  Her description of the doctor's interrogation
implies that he was the victim of Essex' over-eager persecution and that
Elizabeth, though she reluctantly signed the death warrant, was not
fully convinced of his guilt.

Ruy Lopez, though a contemporary of Elizabeth, never visited England.  A
priest from Esteradura, he was Spain's strongest player in the
mid-sixteenth century and published "Libro de la invencion liberal y
arte del Juego del Acedraz" in 1561.  In his book he analyzed a number
of openings, including the one that bears his name, which is not
technically a "gambit" since it does not involve a sacrifice or the risk
of one, and also codified other advice to chess players, including the
useful tip to arrange the board, when playing out-of-doors, so that the
sun is in your opponent's eyes.
 

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