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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: June ::
Re: Q1 Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1092  Wednesday, 30 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Steve Urkowitz <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 10:57:44 EDT
        Subj:   Re: Q1 Hamlet: Some Don Foster Stuff

[2]     From:   Peter S. Donaldson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 12:55:56 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Q1 Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 10:57:44 EDT
Subject:        Re: Q1 Hamlet: Some Don Foster Stuff

Those following this Q1 HAMLET thread would enjoy seeing Don Fosters
essay in EARLY MODERN LITERARY STUDIES.  "A Romance of Electronic
Scholarship; with the True and Lamentable Tragedies of HAMLET PRINCE OF
DENMARK. EMLS 3.3/Special Issue 2 (January 1998):5:1-42.   <URL :
http://purl.oclc.org/emls/03-3/fosatshak.html>   (The journal exists as
a web-place, easily wandered into.)

Foster demonstrates many different ways of approaching the issues of Q1
using the resources of electronic texts.

Learning,
Steve Urkowitz

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter S. Donaldson <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Jun 1999 12:55:56 +0100
Subject:        Re: Q1 Hamlet

>Re: the theory about Q1 and the imaginary auditor speaking and recalling
|>to an equally imaginary Other-I think this is a wonderful idea  but
may
|>I make so bold as to suggest that the same effect  (or defect pace
|>Polonious) might be achieved as a result of a silent "inner" dialogue
|>between the Rememberer and  himself.

Well, yes-this is a friendly amendment to my post about the Q1 "To be.."
speech.  (I hoped no one would take my message too literally-the
Elizabethan shorthand theory was discredited long ago, and I didn't
really hope to revive it).

But if read as the speech of one character-rather than a speech written
by several hands or remembered by several actors-Q1's version "almost"
separates into several distinct voices, proposing, considering,
accepting or rejecting alternatives, often awkwardly.    If Hamlet is an
actor, he may be trying to remember, repeat and make these lines
(commonplaces, old saws, half remembered bits of philosophy) his own.
 

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