1999

Responses

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0943  Friday, 4 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Jun 1999 10:48:27 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0934 Elizabeth and the Status of Players

[2]     From:   Lisa M. Rodriguez <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 04 Jun 1999 03:33:19 +0200
        Subj:   Arkangel Shakespeare

[3]     From:   Tal Carawan, Jr. <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 03 Jun 1999 15:09:04 -0400
        Subj:   That #$&* castle in Richard II!

[4]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 03 Jun 1999 09:02:26 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0937 Assorted Responses


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Jun 1999 10:48:27 +0100
Subject: 10.0934 Elizabeth and the Status of Players
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0934 Elizabeth and the Status of Players

>Robin  Hamilton makes a useful distinction between the legal
>and moral status of the actors.

-- and a third element would be the (London) City Fathers' dislike of
having playhouses on their territory, because it encouraged the Prentice
Boys to take time off work.  So we have a witches' brew of
moral/social/legal elements.

Also "Puritan" in my earlier post WAS sloppy -- Milton, after all,
writes +Comus+ -- but maybe Masques were different?

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa M. Rodriguez <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 04 Jun 1999 03:33:19 +0200
Subject:        Arkangel Shakespeare

Drew Whitehead wrote:

>I keep comparing them to plays that I
>have heard that have been made for solely for radio and consistently
>they don't live up to my expectations.  I fear a repetition of the BBC
>Shakespeare.  Am I being too hard?

I recently purchased Richard II and King John, and unfortunately, I
found them to be a disappointment.  Surely some of the problem is due to
casting choices, with some roles being played by actors who simply sound
far too young or far too old for the characterization selected.  An
excess of spittle accompanying the articulation of even quietly spoken
lines certainly detracted from many scenes in RII.  In general, I found
both tapes lacking in the artistic complexity and compelling drive of
the performances in the Caedmon tapes that I've heard.

I would be curious to hear Pericles, since I don't know of any other
cassette recording that is easily available, but I hesitate to spend
that sort of money on a set of tapes that I won't listen to more than
once or twice.  Has anyone heard the Arkangel Pericles?

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tal Carawan, Jr. <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 03 Jun 1999 15:09:04 -0400
Subject:        That #$&* castle in Richard II!

Thanks all for the input...and Robin, that was helpful to mention your
living in "Luffburrow" as it adds one more possibility for the second
syllable alone in Richard II's Barloughly Castle!  So we have

lock
log
luff
low
leck

As my audition is Saturday morning, I'm committed to how I've been
reading it-

Bar-lock-lee, or sometimes it comes out Bar-log-lee...

So long as I nail the rest of it, I could probably say it any old way
(unless one of the auditors comes from Loughborough!  Thank you for the
input...if I get round to obtaining one of the videos, I'll pass along
what was said, if they dared say it.  But it's full speed ahead, and now
I can focus on the bard's song (from another play) which I must also
sing.  No questions on that one, having done it on stage multiple times!

Tal Carawan, Jr.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 03 Jun 1999 09:02:26 -0700
Subject: 10.0937 Assorted Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0937 Assorted Responses

Lisa Hopkins wrote:

>A footnote to the RSC Midsummer Night's Dream strand: on Saturday, I
>duly took my six-year old son to the production.  He thought it was very
>funny and magical (as did we) and wasn't remotely bothered by any of the
>'sex scenes'.  Actually, if I hadn't seen all the fuss in the papers, I
>don't think it would ever have occurred to me that anyone might find the
>production offensive.

With respect to Lisa Hopkins, and I have quite a lot, there is a bit of
hip rolling as the bed containing Bottom and Titania rises from the
floor.  Puck places the hand of Demetrius over the breast of Helena as
they lie sleeping.  Some people find these things offensive.

Talk about your teapot tempests!  I saw the production a week ago today
(as I write).  It is perhaps a hair more scatological than Adrian
Noble's production of three years ago, but just a hair.  I am stunned
that Dream has such controversy when Othello in the same theater has
simulated oral sex, and between men.  Heavens!  Tales From Ovid at the
Swan is chock full of male nudity post intermission, and Valpone, also
in the Swan, opens with the title character in bed with his dwarf,
hermaphrodite, and eunuch, though everyone is clothed.

I was offended by none of it, but all seem to me to be likelier sources
of controversy than Dream, but Dream got in the papers.  Don't people
drive you nuts?

Mike Jensen

Ad for Shakespeare's Late Plays

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0942  Friday, 4 June 1999.

From:           Douglas McNaughton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Jun 1999 16:25:48 +0100
Subject:        Ad for Shakespeare's Late Plays

Take A Fresh Look At  Shakespeare's Late Plays - including Cardenio -
With This New Book

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New Readings

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Hardback   0 7486 1152 5   


Arkangel Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0940  Thursday, 3 June 1999.

From:           Drew Whitehead <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Jun 1999 09:35:06 +1000 (GMT+1000)
Subject:        Re: Arkangel Shakespeare

I have two queries for the list regarding the Penguin Arkangel
Shakespeare Series.  So far I have bought and listened to eight plays,
MSD, R&J, John, 1&2 Henry IV, Henry V, All's Well, Merchant, and of
these the only one that I have found that showed any real appreciation
for the medium for which they were produced was MSD.  I have noticed
that all eight had the same director, the same composer, and the same
producers and I feel that this is a seriously limiting factor.  As a
rule I love audio Shakespeare and feel that the plays adapt extremely
well to the medium.  However, while I am enjoying the Arkangel series, I
can't help feeling that they could have somehow been, I don't know, a
little less conservative perhaps.  I keep comparing them to plays that I
have heard that have been made for solely for radio and consistently
they don't live up to my expectations.  I fear a repetition of the BBC
Shakespeare.  Am I being too hard?

The second query is to do with academic criticism of the Arkangel
series.  I have performed a fairly thorough search on both the MLA and
Current Contents and I can find no review of the series.  I am wondering
why that should be.  Surely the Arkangel series is no different from any
other performance of a Shakespearean play?  Why then should they be
ignored by the academic journals?

Does anybody have any thoughts on this matter?

Drew Whitehead

Richard II

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0941  Thursday, 3 June 1999.

From:           Dana Wilson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 18:47:25 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Richard II

I have just begun studying Shakespeare's Richard II.  The first fact
which I raised my notice was how heavy the rhyme was in places.

Is there any member of the forum who can tell if any critical analysis
has been done which treats specifically of the use of rhyme in the play,
Richard II?

In I,iii,35, King Richard urges Bolingbroke to speak like a true
knight.  Later in line 135, R accuses both B and Mowbray of disturbing
the peace of his realm with untuned drums, brash trumpets, and iron
arms.

However, B and M use almost heavy rhyme through out the exception being
the lament of M, line 155-75.  The odd thing about these absurd lines is
how rich they are in music metaphors.

Later in II,i,120-5, York warns the king against 'lascivious metres' and
'flattering sounds' of the new 'italian fashion'.

In my opinion, this new 'fashion' must refer to the poetic metres
introduced only a generation before the time of Richard II by Petrarch.

Petrarch who was said to have paid audience to the pope in roman costume
may have represented a secular rebellion against the clerical metres
which at the time of the play were still the fashion of the old guard.

I would appreciate any works on the subject of rhyme in Shakespeare's
Richard II to which the members of the forum could direct me.

My thanks in advance I am,

Yours in the work,
Dana

Cleveland Shakespeare Festival's 1999

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0939  Thursday, 3 June 1999.

From:           Tim Perfect <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Jun 1999 13:38:02 -0600
Subject:        Cleveland Shakespeare Festival's 1999 Season Opens Friday 6/4!

Hello all, please forgive the cross posting:

The Cleveland Shakespeare Festival begins its second season on Friday,
June 4th with "A Midsummer Night's Dream".  Opening the following
Friday, June 11th, will be "Henry V", and opening Friday, June 18th,
Shakespeare's "Edward III: The King and the Countess" will enter as the
third show this season.  We are very pleased to present the Eastern US
premiere of this play, in addition to the first full production in the
world since its inclusion into the canon of Shakespeare's works. Our
season is as follows:

Midsummer:      June 4, 5, 12, 25, July 4, 10
Henry V:        June 11, 13, 19, 26, July 2, 11
Edward III:     June 18, 20, 27, July 3, 9

If you are going to be in the Greater Cleveland area, I hope you will
stop by.  All performances are free, begin at 6:30pm and are performed
outdoors in the courtyard of the Mather Memorial Building, on the corner
of Ford Dr.  and Bellflower Rd. on the campus of Case Western Reserve
University in Cleveland. For more information, please visit our
fantastic website at:

http://www.cleveshakes.org/

Thanks!
Tim

Tim Perfect
Executive Director
Cleveland Shakespeare Festival
http://www.cleveshakes.org/
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