1999

Re: Hamlet en francais

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0923  Tuesday, 1 June 1999.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 11:52:10 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0919 Various Hamlet Postings

[2]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 12:01:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0919 Various Hamlet Postings


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 11:52:10 -0400
Subject: 10.0919 Various Hamlet Postings
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0919 Various Hamlet Postings

>My library has only one copy of Hamlet is French, that of Clara
>(Longworth) comtesse de Chambrun.  Would any of you folks know if this
>is the "standard" French translation, and whether it would have enjoyed
>such a status in the late 1940s?

A piece of Longworth trivia: Clara Longworth lived in Cincinnati, and
was a permanent resident of the Vernon Manor Hotel. She was not well
thought of by the local literati. Somehow I doubt if her French
translation was ever standard, but I could be wrong.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 12:01:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.0919 Various Hamlet Postings
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0919 Various Hamlet Postings

Hamlet en francais

The play was translated almost a year ago by the Acadian playwright
Antonine Maillet for a production at the Theatre de Rideau Vert in
Montreal. Weak, I think.

        Harry Hill

Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0922  Tuesday, 1 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 15:01:41 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

[2]     From:   Si Mealor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 15:19:16 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

[3]     From:   Christine Gilmore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 15:09:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

[4]     From:   C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 May 1999 20:35:52 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 15:01:41 +0100
Subject: 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

Brief Candle [: The Confederate Theater] (Harwell)

-- and +Brief Candles+, the title of an early collection of short
stories by Aldous Huxley

...and a raft of others, including "though his bark cannot be lost / yet
it shall be tempest-tossed," from whence, ahem, The Tempest. (sorry,
couldn't resist)

-- +Tempest-Tost+ is also the title of the first volume of Robertson
Davies' Salterton Trilogy.

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Si Mealor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 15:19:16 +0100 (BST)
Subject: 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

In spite of there being some rich and strange transformations around,
Aime Cesaire is male, author of the fantastic 'Notebook of a return to
my native land' in the 1930s, and former deputy for Martinique in the
French National Assembly.  The 'Notebook' is a marvelous long poem all
about Cesaire returning home to his island after the 'civilizing'
process of education in France, and the ambivalent and violent feelings
he has for France and Martinique.  Superb, as is his re-working of the
Tempest, and definitely well worth looking at for Tempest fans.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Gilmore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 May 1999 15:09:40 -0400
Subject: 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0916 Re: Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

Aime Cesaire is a "male" poet from Martinique. Here is his text:

Author:        C


Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.