1999

Re: Nahum Tate's Lear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1023  Thursday, 17 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 08:20:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

[2]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 10:02:48 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

[3]     From:   Tim Perfect <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 08:35:18 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

[4]     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 12:33:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

[5]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 12:22:29 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

[6]     From:   Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 16:43:41 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

[7]     From:   Melissa D. Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 19:36:22 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 08:20:40 -0500
Subject: 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

For one strongly respectful view, see Richard Strier's essay on the Tate
version and its political implications in Resistant Structures (1995?).

Frank Whigham

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 10:02:48 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

Nahum Tate's Learics

Well....if you wanted a museum piece, you would go ahead and mount
Tate's Fool-less play. It would give the king marginally more stage tim
and your public would be spared a deal of pain.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tim Perfect <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 08:35:18 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

Also, I am still in search of an online rendering of the text of Tate's
'Lear' that can be downloaded.  I have found the facsimile version at:

http://www.library.upenn.edu/etext/furness/leartate/

But have not been able to find a downloadable version as text.  Any help
would be appreciated.  Thanks to those who have responded so promptly. I
will keep you updated as I receive more information.

Tim Perfect
Cleveland Shakespeare Festival
http://www.cleveshakes.org/

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 12:33:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

I for one would be interested in seeing Tate's Lear acted. It was the
reigning version for over a century and actually restores the ending of
Shakespeare's historical sources. But aside from that, I applaud all
productions of adaptations, because I believe that however misguided
they end up being, they do two useful things.

1) They help audiences think about the original text in a different
light. It is extraordinarily difficult these days to see Shakespeare (at
least the better known plays) with fresh eyes. Shakespeare is too much
with us and anything that shakes up our expectations is a huge help.

2) Adaptations point out that "Shakespeare" no longer (and perhaps never
did) begin and end within the boundaries of the playtext. Because of the
way Shakespeare has penetrated Western culture, the meaning of the plays
is much wider and deeper than the story written by Shakespeare. That is
why people can and do write works filling in the background of minor
characters or creating the before or after story. I like to see
adaptations to find out what other people's Shakespeare is like.

Annalisa Castaldo
Temple University

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 12:22:29 CST6CDT
Subject: 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

Hi Tim,

Given that Tate's Lear held the stage for 150 years or so, I think it
might be very interesting to stage it. What would be even more
interesting for a company would be to stage it in repertory with the
original. I might even take a trip to see something like that, finances
permitting.

Chris Gordon

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 16:43:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

I don't really know the play, but I had the opportunity to see a segment
of it staged at Manchester University in Spring 1979 in a presentation
for an A-level school group, combined with several other scenes from
Shakespeare's play with a variety of interpretations.  What struck me
most about the Tate performance (which I had always heard treated in
only the most disparaging way) was that the company played it seriously
as a drama in its own right.  Sets and costumes were in the Restoration
style, complete with full-bottom wigs, and for the first time I realized
that this was a play which grew out of the rationalism of the
Enlightenment and had every right to be taken as seriously as Dryden's
All for Love.  I have still not studied the play, but were I to do so, I
would start with the assumption that it is a viable Restoration play
rather than an adaptation of a Jacobean play.

Ed Pixley
SUNY-Oneonta

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa D. Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 19:36:22 -0400
Subject: 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1018 Nahum Tate's Lear

>I have recently received a proposal from a director who would like to
>direct Nahum Tate's adaptation of Shakespeare's "King Lear", written in
>1681, I believe.
>
>>From what I gather, the biggest (?) differences in the play are the fact
>that the Fool has been cut completely, Cordelia and Edgar have a
>romantic interest in one another, and Lear, in addition to NOT dying,
>regains his kingdom.  Oh yes, Cordelia also lives.
>
>I have an idea about what members of this list will say, but I would
>like to hear your thoughts on this adaptation.  Is it worth doing?  Is
>it worth exploring the possibility of doing?  IS there anything valid
>about this interpretation, other than the fact that it is an adaptation
>of Shakespeare's 'Lear' into a Restoration Comedy, (if that is valid at
>all...)

Actually, it isn't a Restoration Comedy at all, but a tragicomedy.  The
idea of a tragedy with a happy ending is pretty difficult for the
twentieth-century brain to absorb, but for a long time it was the
standard finish on the operatic stage-the "lieto fine." Vide Gluck's
Orfeo ed Euridice, in which Euridice for no good reason I can think of
suddenly un-dies again  to general rejoicing.  Heavy reliance on the god
in the box.

I've actually directed Nahum Tate, in the form of Purcell's *Dido and
Aeneas.*  For what it's worth, I think it would be interesting to stage
it as a curiosity, but I would expect a very limited audience indeed,
composed mostly of theater historians like myself and other persons of
our odd ilk. For starters, Tate writes some pretty bad couplets.  Dido
is notorious
for lines like "Thus on the fatal banks of Nile/Weeps the deceitful
crocodile" and you won't even have Purcell's music to soften it.  If I
were
going to do a Restoration version of Shakespeare, the first one I'd look
at
would be Dryden's All for Love.  Another interesting Shakespeare spinoff
might be Fletcher's The Woman's Prize, or the Tamer Tamed, a sort of
sequel to Taming of the Shrew.

Hope this is of some help.

Melissa D. Aaron
University of Michigan

Re: Pasties

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1022  Thursday, 17 June 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol A Cole <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 08:55:20 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1012 Re: Pasties

[2]     From:   Tony Haigh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 12:27:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol A Cole <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 08:55:20 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.1012 Re: Pasties
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1012 Re: Pasties

In case anyone's taste buds have been piqued by all this discussion of
pasties, I have a genuine Yooper (upper peninsula, for you UK-ers) pasty
recipe, given to me over 20 years ago by a true native, a grad student
from Marquette.  I'd be glad to share it.  Dave, are you more
gastronomically adventurous these days?  Hmmm, it's been awhile, maybe
I'll make some this week.

Carol

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Haigh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 1999 12:27:58 -0400
Subject: 10.0996 Re: Pasties
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0996 Re: Pasties

Pasties unknown in the US?  Not so!  The meat and potato pie is much in
evidence in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  Every restaurant and
bakery you pass, once over the bridge, proudly proclaims "Hot Pasties!"
One might be in Penzance.  The food, a meal wrapped in pastry for the
convenience of miners, was brought to the area by Cornish miners who
moved to the area to work in the copper and iron mines.  The other major
ethnic group in that neck of the woods are the Finns who have adopted
the pasty as their own.  Indeed my mother-in-law would throw me out of
the house if I suggested that the Pasty is anything other than a
traditional Finnish dish.

Yours, in the melting pot,

Tony Haigh
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Star Trek References

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1020  Wednesday, 16 June 1999.

From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Jun 1999 10:15:13 -0400
Subject:        Star Trek References

I was just putting the final touches on my catalog (I know, I know, it
was supposed to be done in May), and realized our Star Trek section is
far from complete.  I am now trying to put together a comprehensive list
of references, whether it be an episode based on Shakespeare, one which
quotes Shakespeare (either pure quotations, or futurized versions of
same), or if the connection is purely titular.

This is what we have so far:

Star Trek #11: Dagger of the Mind (Titular reference)
Star Trek #13: Conscience of the King (plot based on Hamlet, also with
"Arcturian Macbeth" performance)
Star Trek #57: Elaan of Troyius (based on Taming of the Shrew)
Star Trek Next Generation: Defector (Data does Henry V in the holodeck)
Animated Adventures of Star Trek: How Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth
(titular reference)
Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (multiple quotations)

I would be glad for any other listings (please specify the relationship
if at all possible), or corrections to the above.  Once I have completed
the list, a copy will be sent to Chris Gordon for the SHAKSPER archives.

Please feel free to respond off list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Many thanks,

Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick - CD & Video Emporium

Paul Oskar Kristeller

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1021  Thursday, 17 June 1999.

From:           Peter S. Donaldson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday 16 Jun 1999 09:08:31 +0100
Subject: 10.0967 Paul Oskar Kristeller
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0967 Paul Oskar Kristeller

I will miss Paul Kristeller, though I didn't know him very well.   He
discovered the manuscript I edited for my doctoral thesis, the
Ragionamento dell'advenimento delli inglesi et normanni in Britannia
(translated from a lost English original by Bishop Gardiner, who puts in
an appearance in Henry VIII) and published as "A Machiavellian Treatise"

This was at the time of the Columbia strike and its aftermath; my
official advisor in the English department was William Nelson, but I
also worked, mostly by letter, with  Kristeller.  I learned (some)
editing theory and practice from him; I followed up his leads in
European libraries (where I was usually-no, always --  in over my head
in regard to language skills.  Even an introduction by Paul couldn't
make up for poor French and less Spanish when I got to meet the abbots
or librarians he'd referred me to).

Paul was, as is widely known, a very vocal decrier of the student
movement, and the point of this post is to recall a time when a
suspended "radical" graduate student and a conservative senior scholar
could sustain a positive academic relationship despite heated political
passions.  Or, to put it perhaps more accurately, could sustain a
meaningful and supportive non-relationship.  Paul's advice and support
were never contingent on political compatibility (or sartorial
conformity --- those were the days, my friends, of home-made bell
bottoms and dirty red bandannas).  Later, on the few occasions when I
met him at conferences, it was not clear he remembered who I was  -- in
fact it WAS clear that he didn't remember, especially when I encumbered
a greeting by including my first name.  But when he got it, his eyes
would light up, and he would declare, with relish -- "Donaldson! I've
cited you in the Rocky Mountain Medieval Quarterly! --
(or some such journal).  Ah to be cited, and well and truly cited, cited
by such a master scholar.

 (I felt cited. )

But for me, life seemed to offer more (or fewer), or at least other
satisfactions, and I switched, in due course, decades after I ought to
have done so, to Zeffirelli and Baz Luhrmann studies (so to speak).

After such exchanges, Paul would rail-that is the word for it, I think
-- against the student movement-by now long defunct, with all its proper
satisfactions-at dinner. I collaborated by ignoring what he said.  I am
putting this badly, but I mean to say how valuable the awkward
separations between politics and scholarship were then; how they
provided what we would now call a "space" for a career for someone who
could not become a follower of the regnant liberal critics, and who was
active in the antiwar movement; how much his way of acting on his
principles meant to me.

Pete Donaldson

Time in "Comedy of Errors"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1019  Wednesday, 16 June 1999.

From:           Michael Swanson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Jun 1999 12:55:47 -0600
Subject:        Time in "Comedy of Errors"

I'm currently directing a production of "Comedy of Errors," and I'm
curious about how list members interpret the incident in IV. ii., in  l.
55 - 65, when Dromio of Syracuse hears a clock strike on o'clock and
comments, "It was two ere I left him {Antipholus}, and now the clock
strikes one."  The dialogue betwen Dromio and Adriana goes on to
suggest, although Adriana doesn't buy it, that time has actually
reversed itself by one hour.  I can see two possible interpretations:

A) Dromio is so befuddled by the confusing events in Ephesus (that
relate to his having a twin that he doesn't know about, and to the
strangeness of the city) that he hears something other than a clock and
mistakes it for the clock, or else mishears the actual clock strike.

B) Time actually does reverse itself (perhaps in similar fashion to what
happens with time in "Othello"?) in order to allow the confusions to be
solved by the five o'clock meeting time of a number of the principals (a
time which has been established earlier in the play, and which ends up
being the meeting at which the play's mistaken identities are
clarified).

Which of these (or of other interpretations) do others subscribe to, and
why?  Thanks for any input you can give me about this, and about any
questions I may raise in the next couple of weeks.

Incidentally, the production I'm directing is through the auspices of
Shakespeare & More Theatre Company of Central Indiana, Inc., a
one-year-old outdoor summer theatre group dedicated to staging
Shakespeare and other classics.  This summer we are staging "Comedy of
Errors" on July 10, 16, 18, 23, and 31 at 8 p.m.-the first three dates
at Marian College in Indianapolis, the last two at Franklin College in
Franklin, IN-and Moliere's "The Miser" on July 9, 11, and 17 at Marian
College and July 21-4 and 30 at Franklin.  For more information, you may
call me at 317-738-8242, or e-mail me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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