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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Rights to Images
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0341  Thursday, 17 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Nora Kreimer <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 15:28:37 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0332 Re: Rights to Images

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Feb 2000 10:32:05 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0332 Re: Rights to Images


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 15:28:37 -0300
Subject: 11.0332 Re: Rights to Images
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0332 Re: Rights to Images

I am very grateful, and will advise against downloading graphics.
Regardless of acknowledgements, until instructed otherwise. My MLA
handbook 4th edition doesn't caution against crime along these lines.

Thanks again,
Nyke

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Feb 2000 10:32:05 -0000
Subject: 11.0332 Re: Rights to Images
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0332 Re: Rights to Images

Laura Fargas wrote

>Even where there is display of owned images by
>the owners, it is still impermissible for someone
>else to download and duplicate, or print out
>and duplicate, those images without permission.

The act of looking at a website involves downloading and duplicating its
images since downloading is the electronic transfer of an image from the
server to the client, and the image on the computer screen is duplicated
in video RAM as well as application RAM and there's almost certainly a
copy on the hard disk too. So, do you mean the site can't be looked at?

If perhaps you mean that the only permitted form of
downloading/duplicating is "retrieval once-per-view without storing for
later reuse", then the cacheing of images locally, or by institutional
and national proxy servers, would be, according to this statement,
"impermissible". Tens of thousands of computers in the academic
community of the United Kingdom are connected to the Internet through
one national proxy server, whose operator is not held to "publish" the
material that it stores and forwards.

The law hasn't caught up with electronic reality and so long as one
makes little or no money from electronic reproductions and one responds
promptly to requests to stop doing something, one isn't likely to get
into trouble.

I happily offer this as legal advice.

Gabriel Egan
 

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