Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: A Hypertext Model
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0363  Monday, 21 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Peter M. McCluskey <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 18 Feb 2000 14:48:32 -0600
        Subj:   Re: A Hypertext Model

[2]     From:   Scott Crozier <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2000 09:11:22 +1100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0355 A Hypertext Model


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter M. McCluskey <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 18 Feb 2000 14:48:32 -0600
Subject:        Re: A Hypertext Model

Tom Dale Keever muses, "I also note that Eliot fought all his life,
successfully, to keep his poetry from appearing is such a vulgar form as
a paperback book.  I wonder how he would feel if he knew he'd been
published in cyberspace."

Since we've been discussing copyrights and the internet, we might also
ask how Harcourt Brace & Company feel about this unusual website....

(By the way, I'm disappointed that the site doesn't offer a link the
Allman Brothers' album "Eat a Peach.")

Pete McCluskey

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 09:11:22 +1100
Subject: 11.0355 A Hypertext Model
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0355 A Hypertext Model

Although this is not the subject of our list, I would be more than a
little worried if someone used the Prufrock hypertext as a model for
hypertext on any Shakespeare.  Merely making visual images that work
better in words is a waste of technology.  Surely the worth of hypertext
lies in its ability to make connections of cognition that would
otherwise not be possible.  Illustrating poetic images through hypertext
, I think, places concrete limits on a reading rather than offering
means to explore ideas further.

Regards,
Scott Crozier
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.