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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Horatio
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0368  Monday, 21 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Arthur D L Lindley <
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        Date:   Saturday, 19 Feb 2000 09:23:24 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0352 Horatio

[2]     From:   David Bishop <
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        Date:   Sun, 20 Feb 2000 19:54:08 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0352 Horatio


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur D L Lindley <
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Date:           Saturday, 19 Feb 2000 09:23:24 +0800
Subject: 11.0352 Horatio
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0352 Horatio

Martin Mueller's posting reminds me that someone published a very clever
essay a few years ago linking Horatio to the Latin oratio.  I've lost
the reference and, if someone could remind me of author and title, I
would be grateful.

Arthur Lindley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Bishop <
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Date:           Sun, 20 Feb 2000 19:54:08 -0500
Subject: 11.0352 Horatio
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0352 Horatio

The various Roman associations of Horatio cited by Martin Mueller and
David Evett suggest the name had Roman associations, which relates well
to the "antique Roman" line. However, I think it's important to remember
that Horatio is also a Christian, before and even after that line, with
his wish that "flights of angels sing thee to thy rest". The mixture of
Roman and Christian motifs and values seems to me a key to the play.

I have trouble with Clifford Stetner's idea that every Elizabethan would
associate that name with Kyd, more than with, say, Rome-or with
nothing.  Can you remember the names of the main characters in Titanic?
Even with the intensity with which some Elizabethans may have
concentrated on plays, lots else was, and always is, happening. People
they knew had names like this-like Hamnet. I find "ratio" a possible
reason Shakespeare liked the name Horatio, but I doubt if any
association meant much to the audience.  This is a minor character, and
in any case, what the character does counts far more than the name. A
too obviously associative name-like Oldcastle-would I think be a
distraction.

David
 

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