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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Pound of Flesh
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0375  Tuesday, 22 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Nora Kreimer <
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        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2000 11:22:22 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2000 18:49:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <
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Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 11:22:22 -0300
Subject: 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh

A good approach to Shylock appears in: Gross, John, 1992, _SHYLOCK - A
Legend & Its Legacy-_, USA: Simon & Schuster.

It's divided into 3 parts, and the second one includes references to
historical interpretations and impersonations, as its title
"Interpretations" indicates.

Regards
Nora Kreimer

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 18:49:50 -0500
Subject: 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh

In the Genealogy of Morals, Nietzsche refers to "older civilizations" in
an attempt to explain how the "notion of an equivalency between damage
and pain" originally arose.  "...the answer is, briefly: it arose in the
contractual relation between creditor and debtor..." He then goes on to
illustrate his point with examples including the fact that, in these
older civilizations, the

"creditor...had the right to inflict all manner of indignity and pain on
the body of the debtor.  For example, he could cut out an amount of
flesh proportionate to the amount of the debt, and we find, very early,
quite detailed legal assessments of the value of individual parts of the
body.  I consider it already a progress, proof of a freer, more
generous, more Roman conception of law, when the Twelve Tables decreed
that it made no difference how much or little, in such a case, the
creditor cut out-si plus minusve secuerunt, ne fraude esto."

Nietzsche must have read Portia, despite her name, as un-Roman and
something of a Tarquin.

Clifford Stetner
 

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