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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Twelfth Night
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0403  Friday, 25 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Nicolas Pullin <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Feb 2000 17:21:49 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0391 A Twelfth Night Question

[2]     From:   John Briggs <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Feb 2000 09:52:29 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0391 A Twelfth Night Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicolas Pullin <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Feb 2000 17:21:49 -0600
Subject: 11.0391 A Twelfth Night Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0391 A Twelfth Night Question

The action of 3.4 , if you take the internal stage direction, appears to
occur at "orchard's end", i.e. perhaps on the edge of the estate, and
therefore enabling Antonio to hear or see the fracas from over a
wall/fence/hedge (see Nunn's film for such a solution).  As Cesario is
leaving the house, the setting seems to suggest an exterior at any rate.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <
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Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2000 09:52:29 -0000
Subject: 11.0391 A Twelfth Night Question
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0391 A Twelfth Night Question

The simple answer is that:

(a) the folio text is divided into acts and scenes, and
(b) the action in the existing scene is continuous.

If it weren't for (b), editors would happily insert a scene division.
As it is, they shuffle their feet and say "perhaps they don't actually
leave the stage", but at the back of their minds is (a).  The act and
scene divisions probably aren't authorial, but they were made by someone
contemporary who knew about scene divisions, and editors have an uneasy
suspicion that we perhaps don't know as much about what constitutes a
scene division as we thought we did!

John Briggs
 

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