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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Titus Article & Books
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0406  Friday, 25 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Mike LoMonico <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Feb 2000 19:35:44 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0394 Re: Titus Article & Books

[2]     From:   Michael Yawney <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Feb 2000 22:48:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0394 Re: Titus Article & Books


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike LoMonico <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Feb 2000 19:35:44 -0500
Subject: 11.0394 Re: Titus Article & Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0394 Re: Titus Article & Books

For those of you who don't subscribe to the American Cinematographer,
the Titus article is available online at
http://www.cinematographer.com/magazine/feb00/tale/index.htm

We are also running several articles about Titus in the current issue of
Shakespeare Magazine which is currently at the printer.

Mike LoMonico, editor
www.shakespearemag.com

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Yawney <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Feb 2000 22:48:47 -0500
Subject: 11.0394 Re: Titus Article & Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0394 Re: Titus Article & Books

 [snip]
>
>On another note, although I was pretty certain there was no book
>dedicated to Warner's Titus, I hoped I was wrong.  Since no one has come
>forth, so far, with information, I have an alternate suggestion.
>
>Unless I have overlooked something, I wonder if the book Michael Yawney
>saw was actually the Titus Andronicus volume in Manchester University
>Press' "Shakespeare in Performance" series?  It has Brian Cox face on
>the cover and gives the best coverage on the production I have seen.
>Someone picking up the book and spot reading could come upon the Warner
>section and easily remember the book as dedicated to that production.
>
>I was interrupted by life after reading just a few pages of this book,
>and didn't get to the Warner section.  I suspect it is worth reading.
>Everything by Allen Dessen is worth reading.
>
>Next time you are in Stratford, go to the Shakespeare Center Library and
>get the production photos, prompt book, and reviews.  You'll learn even
>more.

I will look to see if the Manchester book is the one. The book I read is
primarily about the Warner production though it does give some
background on other productions for context. I read the book on Warner's
production for about 2 to 3 hours and have been drawing on its ideas
ever since.

It focuses on the process of that went into creating the production,
detailing the rehearsals and discoveries made there. Since Warner went
into rehearsal without an over-arching concept ( or even stage design)
but rather simply a desire to find what would make each individual scene
work (without cuts or stylistic determinism of the sort Brook used), the
insights into dramaturgy spring from the text with a freshness. Her
trust in the strength of the text and skill of her performers was
rewarded. The section describing work on Marius's usually cut speech
when he discovers Lavinia  is particularly striking. That section has
inspired me to keep searching for meaning with actors in many other
"rhetorical" passages that most would delete.

I wish I bought it. I did not. (I was broke-what can I say?) However, I
did recognize its quality so I spent a few hours with it, and it is as I
described: It is about the rehearsals and production directed by Warner.
It does not deal with other production of Titus at all, except very
briefly as background.

If it is not the Manchester book, I am surprised that no one else knows
it.  Perhaps since it describes a practical visceral approach it could
be construed as anti-academic. Still, so few books really get into this
kind of detail about the rehearsal process for landmark productions, it
really ought to be better known.

If only I knew what it was. I will report back when I find the
Manchester book.

---By the way, which Stradford is the one with the library Jensen
describes? Canada, US, or UK?  I have never been to any town of that
name, but if there are decent research facilities maybe a trip would be
worth it.
 

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