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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Money
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0234  Thursday, 3 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Tom Reedy <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Feb 2000 15:02:10 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0220 Re: Money and Prostitution

[2]     From:   Ronald Moyer <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Feb 2000 14:38:42 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: Historical Values of Money


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Reedy <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Feb 2000 15:02:10 -0600
Subject: 11.0220 Re: Money and Prostitution
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0220 Re: Money and Prostitution

Frank Callahan <
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 > wrote:

> Perhaps the comparison is used because prostitution is referred to as
> "the world's oldest profession".  What other "profession" crosses time
> so thoroughly?

That's easy: priest/pimp.  They have since split into two professions.

Tom Reedy

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Moyer <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Feb 2000 14:38:42 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Re: Historical Values of Money

Roy Davies at the University of Exeter offers a page on links to:

Current Value of Old Money

A frequent question is "how much would a specified amount of money at a
certain period of time be worth today?" The sources [that he lists] are
useful in attempting to answer this question. . . .  Over long time
spans, changes in prices give only the very roughest and most
approximate idea of changes in the value of money. Nevertheless, with
this caveat, the sources listed . . .  should be useful for anyone
interested in this subject.

Davies's page can be found at:
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~RDavies/arian/current/howmuch.html

and includes several online sites dealing with historical economic
information (variously, purchasing power, inflation, consumer prices,
costs and wages, etc.) for the UK and the USA, as well as listing
several print resources.  Best,

Ron Moyer
 

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