2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0274  Wednesday, 9 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 14:52:46 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 08 Feb 2000 11:52:45 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 14:52:46 -0300
Subject: 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death

It was, indeed, a treat to realize, once, that sleepwalking in Macbeth
is associated with madness, but it needn't all the time. I had the
amazing experience to have a class with an extraordinary number of
sleepwalkers (more than 5!) who reacted against my use of madness as
associated to a sleep disturbance. Are we going by Elizabethan standards
when we teach this, or, even more anachronistically, by Victorian ones?

Nora Kreimer
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 08 Feb 2000 11:52:45 -0800
Subject: 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death

There's an interesting comparison to be drawn, I think, between Lady
Macbeth's supposed suicide, and Cordelia's death which was also to be
ascribed to her own despair by Edmund's order.  Somebody (I thought it
was Stanley Cavell, but can't find a reference in "The Avoidance of
Love") points out that in Shakespeare's sources, Cordelia also commits
suicide.  If my memory of the argument is correct, Shakespeare is
therefore defending Cordelia against the imputation of despair.
Shakespeare finds this imputation in the sources, but then ascribes it
to the evil character who wants to cover up his crime.

Does anyone remember where this argument occurs?  Chambers points
towards the fact that all Shakespeare's sources would have concurred in
Cordelia's suicide, but somebody else made the further argument that
Shakespeare is defending her against Edmund's lie.

Cheers,
Se 

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