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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Rights to Images
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0300  Monday, 14 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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 >
        Date:   Saturday, 12 Feb 2000 14:35:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0294 Re: Rights to Images

[2]     From:   Tom Reedy <
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 >
        Date:   Saturday, 12 Feb 2000 14:26:47 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0294 Re: Rights to Images


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 12 Feb 2000 14:35:27 -0500
Subject: 11.0294 Re: Rights to Images
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0294 Re: Rights to Images

Nora Kreimer wrote:

>My students acknowledge sources as prescribed
>and thus, we disclaim all possible accusations of trangression.
>Webmaterial us public, so long as acknowledgement is provided.

This would come as a great surprise to anyone with a passing familiarity
with copyright law.  Please cite authorities.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Reedy <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 12 Feb 2000 14:26:47 -0600
Subject: 11.0294 Re: Rights to Images
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0294 Re: Rights to Images

Larry Weiss <
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 > wrote:
>
> Brother Anthony wrote
>
> > I assume that reproductions of paintings and objects in American museums
> > are subject to similar restrictions? It's not copyright as applied to
> > published texts, it's rights to images of property. So long as something
> > belongs to someone (person or institution) its image is protected.
>
> Not so. A similar issue is being discussed on the copyright law list
> 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 , if anyone is interested.

Larry, is there any way you could give us the short-and-dirty version
for those of us who don't want to subscribe to (yet another) list?  I
was under the impression that a copyright expires so many years (75?)
after the artist's death, after which the work goes into the public
domain.

My original query asked about how a government can hold a copyright on
the image of a 400-year-old public document, such as Shakespeare's will,
his deposition in the Belott-Mountjoy suit, his marriage license, etc.

Tom Reedy
 

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