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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Stage Combat
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0327  Wednesday, 16 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Tony Rust <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 17:28:48 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0322 Re: Stage Combat

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 17:37:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0322 Re: Stage Combat


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Rust <
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Date:           Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 17:28:48 -0500
Subject: 11.0322 Re: Stage Combat
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0322 Re: Stage Combat

No, the problem is not enough people are properly trained as stage
combatants AND too many swords that are not made for stage combat are
used.  PLEASE check with SAFD the Society of American Fight Directors
and get proper instruction, training and equipment. A sword should not
bend like that, if it's made for stage combat. Check out as a beginning
source of weapons, American Fencers Supply in San Francisco.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 17:37:20 -0500
Subject: 11.0322 Re: Stage Combat
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0322 Re: Stage Combat

Another hazard of stage combat is making sure that the right guy wins.
As Michael Green points out in "The Art of Coarse Acting," in all school
productions Laertes is inevitably played by the school fencing champion,
and Hamlet has his work cut out for him just managing not to get
skewered in the first pass. As a (very bad) fencer myself, I can testify
that it is a highly unpredictable activity. I've never understood how
Hamlet and Laertes could pick up the wrong weapons after a double disarm
(which is a very rare event anyway)--as you would imagine, if your sword
gets knocked out of your hand, it still ends up pointing in its original
direction (toward your opponent).

Dana
 

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